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NSAID patches?

jessmarimba2010-12-12 10:59:18 +0000 #1
I stopped by our marathon expo yesterday and was given a sample pack of adhesive pain patches. Some sort of menthol combined with an NSAID. Anyone ever used these? Are they safe? I mean, I guess they must be, but are they really any more effective than just taking a pill?
emily_in_nc2010-12-12 11:02:06 +0000 #2
Quote:

Originally Posted by jessmarimba

I stopped by our marathon expo yesterday and was given a sample pack of adhesive pain patches. Some sort of menthol combined with an NSAID. Anyone ever used these? Are they safe? I mean, I guess they must be, but are they really any more effective than just taking a pill?

How interesting! I have not heard of them, but I wonder if the intent is to bypass the digestive system and thus some of the side effects on the tummy some folks (like my DH) get from NSAIDs? I never seem to notice these side effects but I bet my DH would rather try a patch instead of a pill if it would help with this. Anyone in the know?
ny biker2010-12-12 11:35:45 +0000 #3
I've never heard of them. A benefit would be no stomach irritation. The amount of time for the drug to reach therapeutic levels in your blood is probably different. Have you tried looking them up on drugs.com or similar website?

There would also be different side effects. I've taken three different forms of Imitrex for migraine -- tablets, injections and nasal spray. The only one I could tolerate was the tablets. The side effects for the others were stronger and more than I could tolerate.
jessmarimba2010-12-12 11:46:03 +0000 #4
I guess I'm kind of curious - I had been told to try and stay away from any painkillers besides Tylenol because everything else seems to interfere with bone growth?

So I guess I was wondering if these applied to my back would be a worse idea.

Or if that's really just an old wives' tale. The pharmacist I talked to had never heard of the no-NSAIDs rule.
BikeDutchess2010-12-12 12:30:46 +0000 #5
I read something about these recently: query.nytimes.com/gs...t=nyt&pagewanted=all

Reduction in GI problems is one of the benefits. But you have to apply them 4 times a day for maximum effectiveness.

The article also noted "anti-inflammatory drugs in general have been shown to slow healing of tendons and bones," so not quite an old wives' tale, but you and your doctor would have to weigh those risks against the benefits.
OakLeaf2010-12-12 11:15:39 +0000 #6
Slowing recovery isn't the only risk of NSAIDS. (And it's not just tendons and bones, but muscle too - basically, NSAIDS negate the training effect.)

www.msnbc.msn.com/id.../health-pain_center/

So with respect to the systemic effects, a patch would probably be safer (though I'd want to see studies on how much of the drug was absorbed systemically, before automatically concluding that).

I don't have a citation, but I've read that ibuprofen actually doesn't even relieve muscle pain, and that one of the most effective things to use for pain during a race is caffeine. Obviously you can overdo that, too, though.
badger2010-12-12 12:46:00 +0000 #7
they have NSAIDS creams, don't they? I bought a tube in England but sadly had to leave it behind as I was so over my weight limit.

how is your pain these days? I'm having some issues with neck pain for the past week and it's been impacting my sleep so I can certainly empathize!

I use these: www.salonpas.us/ , but it's for minor muscle aches, nothing major.
Possegal2010-12-12 13:21:26 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by emily_in_nc

How interesting! I have not heard of them, but I wonder if the intent is to bypass the digestive system and thus some of the side effects on the tummy some folks (like my DH) get from NSAIDs? I never seem to notice these side effects but I bet my DH would rather try a patch instead of a pill if it would help with this. Anyone in the know?

I would say yes, that is the big advantage to parenteral administration of any NSAID, not having the same GI effects. Though doesn't eliminate them totally.

www.accessdata.fda.g...21234s006s007lbl.pdf

And yes, there are NSAID gels/creams as well. www.accessdata.fda.g...09/022122s006lbl.pdf

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9132322

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