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SI joint and SPD's

Kathi2010-12-13 17:30:28 +0000 #1
For years I have used Speedplay pedals on both my road bike and my mtn bike. Last summer my fitter made some adjustments to my mtn bike and didn't like my heel hitting my crankarm so he put me in Shimano SPD's.

I don't ride my mtn bike often but recently rode 15 miles on a dirt road which involved some climbing but nothing serious. While the pedals didn't seem to bother my left knee they set off my left SI joint and my right side, hip, knee, foot. I also disliked the fact that I couldn't adjust my right foot to a comfortable position.

I tend to have right knee pain on the mtn bike which is probably why I don't ride it much, the Q angle of the crankarms is very wide for me. Since my SI joint issue was discovered last year I had very little knee pain, road biking, hiking, skiing, etc.

In Sept we are planning a 109 mile ride in S.Dakota on gravel trails and I plan to ride my mtn bike and am thinking of going back to my Frogs. Do I need more time and shorter rides to get used to the spd's or am I better off with the Frogs? My fitter adjusted my cleats to "what we thought" was the correct position for my foot so why am I hurting with these pedals?

Should I see a PT for this as I don't understand what foot position has to do with the issues I had? I doubt if my fitter will have answers for me, he's great but not a medical person.


JennK132010-12-13 17:44:24 +0000 #2
I dont have an answer about your pedals, but what is your other bike? I'm guessing you're doing that 3 day Mickelson Trail Ride in SD in September (jealous! wish I could go!!) Have you ridden that before? I was just there in May, and rode my CX bike, my DH on his hybrid from Hill City up to Rochford and back. The trail is really quite "easy", very compact, and no more than a 3% grade anywhere on it. I'm just saying, if your pedals are bothering your knee that much, and you have another bike, you'd be just fine. Even if you're able to switch to a small, knobby tire. The trail is not the least bit technical or rough.

Have fun! Again, I'm jealous....maybe if I can get the time off, I can hitch a ride with you
KnottedYet2010-12-13 17:42:13 +0000 #3
Oh, man.

There's a long and complicated story about foot position and SI joint and why lots of float makes a difference and I don't even know where to start.

I suggest returning to the Frogs.

How badly was the heel hitting the crank arm? If you did it without complaint for years, why did the fitter feel the urge to lock you out of it with SPDs recently?
Kathi2010-12-13 18:06:08 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by JennK13

I dont have an answer about your pedals, but what is your other bike? I'm guessing you're doing that 3 day Mickelson Trail Ride in SD in September (jealous! wish I could go!!) Have you ridden that before? I was just there in May, and rode my CX bike, my DH on his hybrid from Hill City up to Rochford and back. The trail is really quite "easy", very compact, and no more than a 3% grade anywhere on it. I'm just saying, if your pedals are bothering your knee that much, and you have another bike, you'd be just fine. Even if you're able to switch to a small, knobby tire. The trail is not the least bit technical or rough.

Have fun! Again, I'm jealous....maybe if I can get the time off, I can hitch a ride with you

Yes, we're riding the Mickelson Trail Ride, did it last year on the mtn bikes with trail/road tires.

My road bike is a custom Serotta Ottrott. No way will I ride it on that kind of trail. Last year a woman from Denver tried it on a road bike with wide tires. She was extremely uncomfortable especially on the 8 mi downhill from Rochford to Deadwood. I saw several shaky riders on that downhill, whereas, I was very comfortable on my mtn bike.
Kathi2010-12-13 18:12:14 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by KnottedYet

Oh, man.

There's a long and complicated story about foot position and SI joint and why lots of float makes a difference and I don't even know where to start.

I suggest returning to the Frogs.

How badly was the heel hitting the crank arm? If you did it without complaint for years, why did the fitter feel the urge to lock you out of it with SPDs recently?

I had been using WTB Diva saddles which were too pear shaped and most likely too wide for me. When all my issues started with SI joint my fitter measured my sit bones and determined I needed the Specialized Ruby in a 130for my road bike. I liked the Ruby so much that I bought the Ariel SL. With the change in saddle my position changed. Now that I think more about it the Frogs weren't allowing my foot to toe out the way he thought it should because the pedals have a stop and I was hitting that instead of the crankarm. That's why he locked it in with the SPD's. Short rides around the neighborhood I was fine and thought he did the right thing. On my road bike I'm now more symmetrical, not sitting with my left side forward and my right foot feels more comfortable pointing forward. However, my road crankset is a Specialties TA compact double that has a narrow Q angle, whereas, my mtn bike has a Shimano triple crankset with a much wider Q angle.
Kathi2010-12-13 19:05:43 +0000 #6
One more question. This summer, if I don't keep up with my stretches, the SI joint starts talking to me. My PT worked on it June a year ago and I don't remember it complaining so much until recently. Does this mean he needs to look at it again or is this normal?

I have to do it soon, he sold his business and I will be looking for another PT who understands this issue.
KnottedYet2010-12-13 18:59:23 +0000 #7
While you're looking for a new PT, can you also find one who does bike fits? Then having the PT assess your fit and how it effects your physical issues will be covered by insurance. It might be nice to have one person looking over the entire ball of wax.

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