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Exercise-induced insomnia

Catrin2010-12-12 23:58:32 +0000 #1
Having pretty significant problems with this right now as I am ramping up the intensity of my training both on and off the bike. Am listening to my trainer - he knows my tendency to push overly hard - so I don't think that is the problem.

The problem is that I have to rise at 4am to get ready for work. I have long hours in the office so the only time I can really exercise during the week is a little later than I should be exercising. Have been on this schedule for almost a year, but the intensity has changed greatly over the year.

My body will adjust, and I am making certain that I have two rest days a week so I get good sleep on those nights at least. Am trying not to have caffeine of any kind after 1pm - is there anything else that would be helpful? I am actually not overly tired so am not overly concerned right now - just ready for my body to adjust already

I have tried chamomile teas in the past for this and did not find it helpful. It doesn't help that I can hear every step that my upstairs neighbor makes, and she comes home about the time that I am trying to sleep, and she stays up until almost time for my alarm to go off. She isn't doing anything wrong, it isn't her fault that the floor creaks...


artifactos2010-12-13 00:06:16 +0000 #2
I have heard from many people that taking a magnesium supplement helps a lot with being able to fall asleep.

I tend to stay awake due to sounds a lot, too, and it got to the point where I hadn't had a decent night's sleep in over a month. I started wearing earplugs to bed again (yes, I can still hear my alarm clock and the smoke alarm) and I'm sleeping a lot better. You might want to try it?
Catrin2010-12-13 00:09:47 +0000 #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by artifactos

I have heard from many people that taking a magnesium supplement helps a lot with being able to fall asleep.

I tend to stay awake due to sounds a lot, too, and it got to the point where I hadn't had a decent night's sleep in over a month. I started wearing earplugs to bed again (yes, I can still hear my alarm clock and the smoke alarm) and I'm sleeping a lot better. You might want to try it?

hmmm and you can still hear the alarm? I hate things inside my ears, but I need to do something different. Tried turning on the fan and that didn't help. Will also check out the magnesium supplement - and it seems to me that others have said here that it is good for cyclists anyway?
greenbeanvw2010-12-13 00:34:07 +0000 #4
Melatonin might help you.
BleeckerSt_Girl2010-12-13 01:03:03 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by Catrin

The problem is that I have to rise at 4am to get ready for work.

.....Am trying not to have caffeine of any kind after 1pm...

This is a helpful page, read the part especially about caffeine:

www.sleepwarrior.com...e-causes-of-insomnia

Caffeine can take a long time to completely leave your system. I've had days where I had a coffee at 4pm, gone to bed at 10pm, and not been able to get to sleep because of the residual caffeine, even though I didn't 'feel' any caffeine jitters anymore. Try eliminating any caffeine except for your first dose when you get out of bed.
tulip2010-12-13 02:01:05 +0000 #6
I drink my tea, occasionally coffee, in the morning. One cup. Yoga before bed works for me. I have to have some quiet time-- I can't just go go go and then fall asleep.

I've also noticed that turning my computer off at 7 pm works wonders. I don't have a tv, so I read books, groom my dog, or just think about my day.
Catrin2010-12-13 00:51:53 +0000 #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by BleeckerSt_Girl

This is a helpful page, read the part especially about caffeine:

www.sleepwarrior.com...e-causes-of-insomnia

Caffeine can take a long time to completely leave your system. I've had days where I had a coffee at 4pm, gone to bed at 10pm, and not been able to get to sleep because of the residual caffeine, even though I didn't 'feel' any caffeine jitters anymore. Try eliminating any caffeine except for your first dose when you get out of bed.

This is helpful - and was also reading on a few pages about magnesium's role in sleeping. It seems a good thing to try - just have my early morning tea or coffee, then try a magnesium supplement at night. Even when I get to sleep I can't stay that way right now - and the supplement may help with that.

Tulip - I hear you, and that is probably part of the problem as well. I am active from the moment my feet hit the ground until bed time.... I do have a tv, but very few channels and it is off most of the time.

Stopping exercise/training would solve it - but that is not an option

I found this page: www.holisticonline.c...ep_ins_nutrition.htm that deals with different nutritional options for insomnia. I found other pages as well, but they were all from the manufacturers of the supplement.

Tulip - good reminder - I do tend to be active from the minute my hand finally turns the alarm off rather than hitting the snooze button yet another time
BleeckerSt_Girl2010-12-13 00:27:08 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by Catrin

Even when I get to sleep I can't stay that way right now...

This sounds VERY familiar to me on days when I have that afternoon cup of coffee. Even when I can get to sleep, it seems to make my sleep very light and I keep waking up too easily- I can't get deeply asleep. It took me YEARS to recognize that this was due to having some caffeine a little too late in the afternoon. Now I know that I need about 10 hours after the caffeine for it not to affect my sleep at all. Your mileage may vary.

Your description really rings a bell with me on the subtle lingering effects of caffeine. Been there done that. I hope that's the answer for you, since it's pretty easily solved.

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