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Hip Arthritis...

Catrin2011-02-06 23:15:14 +0000 #1
My physical therapist suggested a hip x-ray a few weeks ago to rule out arthritis. Some of my quad tendon pain is apparently consistent more with hip arthritis (and isn't actually quad tendon pain). Apparently there was good reason for that, for I just learned that I've mild hip arthritis.

At least it is mild and it doesn't HAVE to progress. Will meet with my PT tomorrow after my training session to see what, if anything, we change. My doctor tells me that PT or a shot in the hip by a specialist are really my only real options. There isn't that much pain to justify some of the prescription pain relievers available that have such nasty side-effects - and a shot is NOT an option unless it should get much worse. God willing that won't happen.

Considering that I've woken up a few times recently with mild hip pain I am not all that surprised. Not happy, but not surprised. At least it is mild!
lo1232011-02-06 23:30:59 +0000 #2
Hip injections have really helped me. I have one of the autoimmune forms of arthritis, and my hips are the only area that continues to hurt despite aggressive treatment.

The injections I've had were done by my rheumatologist who is also board certified in pain management (yay!). They're done at the hospital or an outpatient facility under fluoroscopy (live x-ray). I've never been sedated for them, but it is an option with some doctors. I got 6-8 months out of one and about a year out of another. Your mileage might vary.

I've also done PT to help. Because of the pain, I've limped a good bit over the last 5 years or so, and my musculature has changed. PT helped balance me back out and get my gait back to normal.

Also, if you haven't had a pro bike fit and talked about the hip issues, I'd suggest getting one done. I sit pretty high on my bike according to just about everyone who sees me on it, but it makes my hip happy.
Catrin2011-02-06 23:37:14 +0000 #3
My current bike has been fit to me well, but we didn't know about hip issues at the time. My arthritis is mild, but I do note odd sensations in that area much of the time these days - most if the time I wouldn't call it pain. It does, however, wake me in the night, though it isn't bad, just enough to wake me

In mid-Jan I am getting fit for a custom bike, and we will certainly take this into consideration. My physical therapy was wrapping up for my leg injuries, but my doctor has just sent over another order for more sessions. Thankfully I can use my flexible spending account in the new year to cover this - so will likely put off more visits until Jan.

I am going to put off shots until there is no choice in the matter...
indysteel2011-02-06 23:44:09 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by Catrin

My current bike has been fit to me well, but we didn't know about hip issues at the time. My arthritis is mild, but I do note odd sensations in that area much of the time these days - most if the time I wouldn't call it pain. It does, however, wake me in the night, though it isn't bad, just enough to wake me

In mid-Jan I am getting fit for a custom bike, and we will certainly take this into consideration. My physical therapy was wrapping up for my leg injuries, but my doctor has just sent over another order for more sessions. Thankfully I can use my flexible spending account in the new year to cover this - so will likely put off more visits until Jan.

I am going to put off shots until there is no choice in the matter...

While it has been fit to you, you're not at the optimal set up in that your saddle is by your own admission still too low. Now I have absolutely NO IDEA whether that's contributed at all to your pain, but it is a question mark. You might ask your PT if a repetative movement in which your hip isn't allowed to fully open would cause any joint and/or muscular issues.

And as with my own hip arthritis, remember that it may have nothing to do with the pain you're experiencing or may just partially explain it.
Catrin2011-02-07 00:02:57 +0000 #5
I hear you Indy, and my saddle height is much better than it once was. I am not changing it again, however, until I can start riding a little more frequently.

My physical therapist thinks that the hip not opening fully in the pedal stroke may have contributed to the hamstring injury (especially once I started clipping in), but not the quad injuries. He isn't recommending any changes to what I am doing - he is comfortable with what my trainer has me doing and he isn't concerned that I am being too lazy

I haven't ridden in three weeks due to the weather and work so at least I know that my riding position isn't contributing to anything just now

What is odd to me is that I get assorted leg pain when my legs are at rest - for example today when my PT was checking out my hip flexibility he was pushing on the outside of my hip and it hurt in my groin area. Or I wake up in the night with my hip aching (whichever side I am lying on) but so is a portion of my calf below my knee. I know it is just referred pain, and I do have some neurotension in my calves, but it is just odd. At least he does not think that my back is part of this at all, for which I am thankful.

So I will keep doing his stretches and exercises, keep listening to my trainer, and keep putting one foot in front of the other.
indysteel2011-02-06 23:56:02 +0000 #6
The worst of my hip pain was when I was sitting or sleeping. Interestingly, riding my bike didn't really hurt.

I don't begin to understand it all. I just know that our bodies compensate for weakness, injury and the like in some really intersting ways, some of which lead to pain. That's what made me think that your saddle being too low (if I remember your last mention of the subject, it was still an inch too low--which is a lot) might be a contributing factor as you're limiting your leg and hip's natural range of motion. Something within you might be overcompensating for that.

With that, I totally and otherwise defer to whatever Knotted may have to say!
BleeckerSt_Girl2011-02-06 23:49:42 +0000 #7
When I stop doing my 3-5 mile brisk fitness walk once or twice a week, I slowly begin to get achiness in my hip joints back again, regardless of whether I'm biking a lot or not. I start to feel creaky and achy in the mornings, especially in my hip joints. (I'm 56)

When you are biking, your leg never really gets flexed back behind you, like it does when you walk vigorously. Biking just doesn't do for my hips what regular brisk walking (with long strides) does. Once I start regular fitness walks again, my hip joint aches go away again.

Just something to consider.
Catrin2011-02-07 00:33:27 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by indysteel

The worst of my hip pain was when I was sitting or sleeping. Interestingly, riding my bike didn't really hurt.

I don't begin to understand it all. I just know that our bodies compensate for weakness, injury and the like in some really intersting ways, some of which lead to pain. That's what made me think that your saddle being too low (if I remember your last mention of the subject, it was still an inch too low--which is a lot) might be a contributing factor as you're limiting your leg and hip's natural range of motion. Something within you might be overcompensating for that.

With that, I totally and otherwise defer to whatever Knotted may have to say!

This certainly could be contributing, though I've been able to ride so rarely since early October that I wonder how much of a factor this could be currently. My PT thinks it may well have contributed to the original hamstring injury in September, but not the quad injury. It has been almost 3 weeks since my last ride

Now that I feel well enough to ride, the weather is conspiring against me - or at least it feels that way sometimes. I can't remember how low my saddle still is, but I do think that it is less than an inch now.

Quote:

Originally Posted by BleeckerSt_Girl

When I stop doing my 3-5 mile brisk fitness walk once or twice a week, I slowly begin to get achiness in my hip joints back again, regardless of whether I'm biking a lot or not. I start to feel creaky and achy in the mornings, especially in my hip joints. (I'm 56)

When you are biking, your leg never really gets flexed back behind you, like it does when you walk vigorously. Biking just doesn't do for my hips what regular brisk walking (with long strides) does. Once I start regular fitness walks again, my hip joint aches go away again.

Just something to consider.

Hmmm, good point. I have no stiffness, and while my right leg is less flexible than the other, my flexibility is pretty good. I just get these strange pains, some of which is quite obviously in my hip. It isn't very bad though. just enough for me to notice. Your point about the range of motion involved in brisk walking is a good one.

Back when I was not allowed to do any cardio work at all - all I COULD do was walking, so have developed the habit of a 20-30 minute walk around the track prior to all training sessions or spinning class to help my legs warm up. I will keep this in mind and expand it to see how a good fitness walk once or twice a week might help me. Running is out of the question, so this might be a good alternative.

I do hope that Knotted reads this and gives her perspective

I think it is a good sign that my physical therapist thinks that I've improved enough to stop seeing him - outside of a couple of sessions in January in case we want to try a couple of medication applications to the sole quad tendon that hasn't yet healed - I forget what it is called but the medication is applied directly to the skin via a patch ... iontophoresis? Something like that.

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