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Warming up in cold weather

Catrin2011-02-11 21:23:42 +0000 #1
I over-think things, I freely admit it. Giving that I've been given permission to slowly get back on the bike, we know that my tendons are not yet healed. Indeed I was reminded of that last night when I was foolish enough to try clipping in during spinning class. The class was fine. While my hamstring is find today, my quad tendon is most cranky with me

Nothing major though, just a reminder that I have to behave myself and let it rest for a few days. Without clipping in there are no problems at all...stupid me for going there.

Should I worry about my compromised muscles/tendons not warming up quickly enough in the cold weather? I do have access to some flat roads in a park before cutting through to the other side and reaching my coveted country roads. Wondering about the wisdom of riding in <35 temps until this is healed...
indysteel2011-02-11 21:27:35 +0000 #2
Catrin, I don't have an answer for you, but if you're concerned about is, why not get warmed up a bit on your apartment complex's spin bike and then head out on the road?
marni2011-02-11 21:34:45 +0000 #3
it always takes me about 10 miles to get warmed up no matter what the temperature. Since I have floating cartiledge and am missing the ACL in one leg I do however always make it a point to keep my knees warm with knee warmers or tights. The hard part about riding out into the cold is that although you may need layers to start, you warm up from riding sooner rather than later. Knee warmers can be easily removed and stowed in a jersey pocket. But then my tights all have zippers in them so I can also unzip and roll them up to look like knickers and ride that way.

Having had injured muscles, tendons and ligaments, I would advise taking it very slow and easy and be careful not to let yourself get cold while riding.
Catrin2011-02-11 21:40:57 +0000 #4
Thanks for your thoughts - I had thought about the spinning bike here at the complex, but would need to do that in my cycling gear for outside - wondering if I would get overly warm that way and be sweating when I hit the cold air on the bike...only one way to find out how this approach would work and that is to try it

Marni - thanks for the confirmation - that was my assumption but was wondering if I was over-thinking this. It is good to know that I was not. I will take my time and make sure I am dressed properly. After Monday night I probably can't ride until next week anyway since I over-did it a little
Melalvai2011-02-11 22:37:54 +0000 #5
The trainer at the gym recommended that I warm up with indoor core exercises before running or biking or swimming. The turkish stand-ups really get my heart pumping & my face red (10 on each side).
indysteel2011-02-11 23:22:39 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by Catrin

Thanks for your thoughts - I had thought about the spinning bike here at the complex, but would need to do that in my cycling gear for outside - wondering if I would get overly warm that way and be sweating when I hit the cold air on the bike...only one way to find out how this approach would work and that is to try it

I wouldn't worry too much about your lower body being overdressed for the spin bike. As for your upper body: I'm not sure how you're layering, but I would assume you could hold off on putting your outermost layer on (a jacket?) until you're ready to hit the road. What I'm contemplating is about a gentle 10 to 20 minute warm-up. Just long enough to get your muscles activated, but not enough to really get overly sweaty.

In my mind, the bigger issue about riding outside right now with your lingering injury is that the wind and cold really makes it hard to take it easy. I find that I need to push myself harder in the cold just to stay warm. If I ride too slowly, I just can't get warmed up enough. Add in the wind and it's pretty difficult to go out for an easy spin.
OakLeaf2011-02-12 00:14:56 +0000 #7
If it were me, I'd dress as though I weren't planning to exert myself at all - and then if I started to sweat, that would be the indication that I was working too hard to keep from aggravating my injury.
Catrin2011-02-11 22:01:50 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by indysteel

In my mind, the bigger issue about riding outside right now with your lingering injury is that the wind and cold really makes it hard to take it easy. I find that I need to push myself harder in the cold just to stay warm. If I ride too slowly, I just can't get warmed up enough. Add in the wind and it's pretty difficult to go out for an easy spin.

This exact thing is what I have been considering...I haven't yet reached a decision on whether I should just ride when it is >39 degrees until this is finally and fully healed... At least on the spinning bike I am in total control of the resistance.

Quote:

Originally Posted by OakLeaf

If it were me, I'd dress as though I weren't planning to exert myself at all - and then if I started to sweat, that would be the indication that I was working too hard to keep from aggravating my injury.

This is a good option Oakleaf and one that I will consider. I will have to be honest with myself on this one - my tendency to ignore such things once I get into the groove of things would have to be taken into hand, so to speak. My recovery is to the point where any soreness/twinging/whatever now comes the next day rather than during the actual activity so I suspect this is a time when I could easily re-injure...

I appreciate the input everyone, thank you! My PT isn't a cyclist so he hasn't been able to provide much input on this side of things - other than to caution me that I need to come back slowly and ride easy.

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