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Knee pain and saddle position

Owlie2011-02-15 04:14:54 +0000 #1
I'll preface this by saying that I know I need a fitting. I'm still scraping the $ together for it.

DBF adjusted my saddle since the last time I rode outside for an appreciable distance (October, since I'm not counting NYE), for a better knee-over-pedal position. My knees, after half an hour on the trainer on the second-lowest resistance level, are not terribly happy.

Is it reasonable to assume that for some of us, the knee-over-pedal thing isn't quite optimal?
OakLeaf2011-02-15 04:29:19 +0000 #2
That's what I've heard ... but more likely, did he change the seat height at the same time he changed the fore/aft position? Remember that changing fore/aft changes the distance from your hip joint to the pedal, so if you move the saddle back you also have to move it lower (assuming you were at a good seat height at the old position), and if you move it forward you have to move it higher.
indysteel2011-02-15 04:40:06 +0000 #3
Before your BF adjusted your saddle, was your knee in front of the pedal spindle or behind it? Did he adjust your saddle height to account for the change he made to the saddle's fore/aft position? How much would you say that he changed it? Where does your knee hurt? Have you been giving yourself a long warmup on the trainer? Are you potentially just pushing too big of a gear?

For me, KOPS is not optimal in that I like to be a bit further behind the pedals. A good fitter will tell you that KOPS is just a starting place; there is some flexibility in the rule of thumb. That said, I think there are potentially a few other things that might explain your knee pain.
LivetoRide2011-02-15 04:59:29 +0000 #4
Ditto Indysteel that it's just a starting point and needs to be played around with for some.

I recommend checking out this article-- www.cptips.com/knee.htm

Scroll down to "Knee Pain (Knee Pain Location)" which is towards the top of the article.
bluebug322011-02-15 05:37:51 +0000 #5
You can put together your own plumb line with a piece of string and a nut or washer. This will give you some idea of where your knee is lined up. Also, be sure to make very small adjustments at a time.

As someone who has suffered from knee pain from a poorly fitting bike, I definitely think you're making the right decision to have a fitting. Good luck. That made all the difference for me.
Melalvai2011-02-15 06:05:36 +0000 #6
I recently learned that there is more to knee pain than saddle height and (if you are clipped in) clip positioning.

My spin class instructor told me to ride knock-kneed, with my knees almost touching the top tube, to provide stability especially during sprints. I had first gotten that same knee pain on the only bike tour I've done (744 miles in 10 days). Then it came up two years later when I joined spin class last month. I am excited that I learned something in spin class that is applicable to road riding!
KnottedYet2011-02-15 06:29:39 +0000 #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by Melalvai

My spin class instructor told me to ride knock-kneed, with my knees almost touching the top tube, to provide stability especially during sprints. I had first gotten that same knee pain on the only bike tour I've done (744 miles in 10 days). Then it came up two years later when I joined spin class last month. I am excited that I learned something in spin class that is applicable to road riding!

If someone has inadequate hip stabilizers, they can "borrow" stability by torquing on the internal structures of the knee. (Just like a person can "borrow" stability in standing by locking the internal structures of the knee.)

Can you ask your spin instructor to teach you how to selectively strengthen your deep hip rotator muscles instead?

I often see people after the damage has been done and their knees are toast. They are paying me hundreds of dollars to adjust their bike fit and their riding posture and strengthen their butts; and paying the surgeon thousands of dollars to repair the damage caused by habitually riding knock-kneed.

There is nothing wrong with dropping into knock-knee for extra power and stability when one is in dire straits (racing to clear the intersection before the semi running the red light). It is a valid strategy for extraordinary situations. But that is something the body will do automatically as it pulls out all the stops to save itself.

Riding knock-kneed is not something one should consciously try to attain or sustain.

A strong butt is your knees' best friend!
malkin2011-02-15 07:21:40 +0000 #8
Isn't a strong butt pretty much a friend to all?

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