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Saddle/ coccydynia

teamceri2011-03-29 13:21:21 +0000 #1
I all

Hope this post doesn't appear twice. I have just been diagnosed with coccydynia and told to stay off bike until the inflammation is gone, this I imagine to be when the pain is gone. The doc said to either and or get a new saddle or adjust the one I have. I have no clue where to start so didn't know if anyone here had same problem or any advice to offer.

Tina
Muirenn2011-03-29 13:36:23 +0000 #2
I can think of a lot of people on here with better answers than me.

But to start, what kind of saddle were you using before? What type of pain and where exactly? (Okay to be graphic , have you ever had a professional bike fitting? Have you ever had your sitbones measured? What type of bike(s) do you ride and is your position more upright or aero? Did you use cycling shorts and if so what kind? Do they fit properly? Do you think you need a cut-out saddle or will a cut-out cause problems?

Any other pain on the bike? Back, neck, arms, hands, wrists. Do your knees hurt during or after riding?
teamceri2011-03-29 13:48:06 +0000 #3
Hi thanks for your reply. I ride a carbon race bike a tourer and a hard tail mountain bike. Have had the race bike four years the tourer for two and the mountain bike one year. Have been using the same saddles all of this time and cycle gear padded shorts etc. After a recent lay off bike for two months started back again three weeks ago 23 miles two days off another 23 miles was in total agony. Hurts like no tomorrow getting up from sitting position and sitting down again. Never experienced anything like it before. I have been dieting and lost 14 pound. Saw my doctor today who did gave me the diagnosis of the coccyx condition. She seems to think I need new saddle or need to adjust because of weight loss. The pain i really low down near butt that hard bone you can feel there. I have to lay off bike until it is better and use inflammatory gel in the meantime. I have been looking a the terry falcon x saddle but don't know if there is a stockist in the UK. It says this saddle has a cut our for people with coccyx problems. Any other help and advice anyone can give would appreciate and I do not want to give up my bikes.
Muirenn2011-03-29 14:29:06 +0000 #4
Have you heard of the Adamo saddles?

www.ismseat.com/index.htm

Edit:

Perhaps check out the Cobb saddle too:

www.cobbcycling.com/
Thorn2011-03-29 13:37:34 +0000 #5
Check out the threads on measuring sit bones and saddle width. Pain in the coccyx area can be caused by the saddle being too narrow for your sit bones.

When I road a saddle that was too narrow, I'd be OK until I got off the bike. Then, the pain in the coccyx area was present.
Muirenn2011-03-29 14:45:48 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by Thorn

Check out the threads on measuring sit bones and saddle width. Pain in the coccyx area can be caused by the saddle being too narrow for your sit bones.

When I road a saddle that was too narrow, I'd be OK until I got off the bike. Then, the pain in the coccyx area was present.

I assumed from her answer that she knows that type of thing. It would be helpful if we knew the make and model of the saddle that is causing her pain; gives a basis for comparisons and recommendations.

Tina, even if you have had a bike-fitting before, I wonder if a new one isn't in order to help you accommodate this injury. I know Knot has mentioned bike fitters that are qualified as PT's, etc. Maybe you should look into something like that, even if you have to travel. The fact that the doctor suggested changing seat-post height, and the new pain in riding sounds like you may need to make real changes.
malkin2011-03-29 13:58:23 +0000 #7
Oh...OW.

While you are waiting to feel better you'll have some time to read all the saddle threads...

Wishing you the very best!
KnottedYet2011-03-29 15:59:31 +0000 #8
Saddle is one or more of the following:

too narrow at the sits

too domed over the top

too padded

too pear shaped and forcing you forward onto a narrower part.

It's all about causing pressure and tensile stress to the sacrotuberous ligament, and also to a lesser extent the other ligaments, that anchor on or near the coccyx.

I work in both a pelvic pain/continence program and do bike fits. There are PTs out there who have training in both, and have a strong interest in saddles and saddle fit. If you can find one to work with, before you go buying any new saddles or new shorts, that would be the best way to go. Your insurance should pay for a saddle fit or bike fit from a PT as part of your treatment.

(BTW, the complete opposite of all the above is a Brooks B67 or B68 [men's, not "Short"] saddle)

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