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First Yoga Class!

Catrin2011-04-01 20:23:11 +0000 #1
The instructor seemed quite surprised to learn that I had never been in a yoga class before, but she took it in stride. I have no idea what kind of training she had but I liked her.

To start with I met with my trainer for 35 minutes, then I had an hour break before class. I didn't want to really cool down so I just walked on the track for a good portion of that. I have a new routine about getting in one 4-5 mile walk a week anyway.

I told her about my issues with knee and hip - and she made very clear that I need to listen to my body. There was one pose where she had me just sit and watch the first time they did it, then I joined in the next time. When they did shoulder stands she had me do something different.

There was really only one pose I just could not do at all, probably from hip and back stiffness. My knee did start to ache, but that stopped immediately and is fine this morning. Of course, that may have been from the walking just as much as from the class. My trainer is very careful with things that impact my knees, so I know it wasn't from that.

I did like the class, but I am a little concerned that it might be too much for my knee right now. I do think it is a good sign that the aching stopped immediately, so perhaps this will resolve as my muscles become accustomed to the movement.

Saturday morning will head to the mat Pilates class and see if it has the same effect on my knee. I liked the Yoga class better than Pilates, I especially liked the range of movement, the slow pace and the meditative atmosphere. I also sweated a lot more than I do in Pilates, that has to be a good sign


NbyNW2011-04-01 20:26:50 +0000 #2
That's great, Catrin!

Sounds like your yoga instructor took a very sensible approach. My guess is that she will be interested to know how you feel these first few days after the class and hopefully she will have some suggestions for how you can avoid aggravating the knee.

Your explorations with your hip/back/knee have inspired me. I've been living in denial of some chronic muscle soreness, mostly IT band up through my glutes and lower back, especially when I have snow to shovel! Gets me thinking that maybe I can relieve some of these problems if I change things up a bit.
jessmarimba2011-04-01 20:53:23 +0000 #3
Glad you had such a great experience! I fear those really slow paced classes - my teacher last week spent so long explaining everything to all of the new people I thought my arms were going to fall off

We barely covered any poses, but after 5 minutes straight in downward dog I was sweating buckets!
indysteel2011-04-01 21:11:46 +0000 #4
I'm glad you liked the class, Catrin! You know how I feel about yoga; it's my weekly safety valve. Do you remember what pose or poses bothered your knee or was it just class in general? Have you seen your doc yet about it?
Catrin2011-04-01 20:50:29 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by indysteel

I'm glad you liked the class, Catrin! You know how I feel about yoga; it's my weekly safety valve. Do you remember what pose or poses bothered your knee or was it just class in general? Have you seen your doc yet about it?

It was pretty much just class in general - though I do have to wonder if it was primarily from crossing my legs - I suspect that was the culprit since it puts pressure on the kneecap. It did not hurt it when I did it but, in retrospect, I probably should not have done that.

I am taking a topical medication meant to bring down the inflammation. It is much better than it was! I am going to visit him next week if it is still bothering me, we are giving it a little over 2 weeks for the medicine to work. Feels great on the bike/spinning bike though
indysteel2011-04-01 21:52:08 +0000 #6
My knees and hips don't always like cross legged. At the worst of my hip pain, I couldn't sit cross legged at all.

If yoga messes with your knee then, by all means, don't do it, but I do think a mindful yoga practice can better attune you to the things your body can and can't do, which could be beneficial to you since you've indicated in the past that sometimes you can't tell the difference between soreness and injury.
OakLeaf2011-04-01 22:15:45 +0000 #7
Some poses will always be problematic to some people, but it seems to me that focusing on foot loop and inner spiraling the thighs really improves knee safety. This language might be unique to Anusara and/or Iyengar, but I think any style of yoga has the same concepts of alignment? My teacher always makes sure we engage the feet, and sit on whatever we need to to keep the knees below the hips, in sukhasana.

www.doyoga.com/updat...revisited_update.pdf

www.yogatic.com/yoga...ciples-of-alignment/

I know for me that I've had to work a LOT on foot strength and flexibility. It's coming, little by little. It's been so exciting to me to start seeing some movement in my tarsal-metatarsal joints, that had been completely locked.

It's a fine line, too - especially with your history of pushing too far - but for me, yoga brings blood, lymph and healing to injured areas like no other workout does. There's a kind of ouch I can tell is good, but there's definitely an ouch to avoid, too, and you're probably best avoiding anything that hurts.
Catrin2011-04-01 21:03:42 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by indysteel

My knees and hips don't always like cross legged. At the worst of my hip pain, I couldn't sit cross legged at all.

If yoga messes with your knee then, by all means, don't do it, but I do think a mindful yoga practice can better attune you to the things your body can and can't do, which could be beneficial to you since you've indicated in the past that sometimes you can't tell the difference between soreness and injury.

Right now ANYTHING can mess with my knee until the supporting structure gets stronger. Some days even walking make me aware of the existence of the knee-cap

I can see some definite benefits to Yoga that I didn't notice in the Pilates class. I have developed such an ingrained habit of totally ignoring anything remotely like pain - and there were reasons how that happened - that I quite often am unsure if something is just soreness or injury. Had a broken bone once that I ignored for three weeks - I assumed it was just sprained since I could still use the thing

I do like the idea that an intentional and mindful yoga practice can help me become more aware of my body limitations.

Quote:

Originally Posted by OakLeaf

Some poses will always be problematic to some people, but it seems to me that focusing on foot loop and inner spiraling the thighs really improves knee safety. This language might be unique to Anusara and/or Iyengar, but I think any style of yoga has the same concepts of alignment? My teacher always makes sure we engage the feet, and sit on whatever we need to to keep the knees below the hips, in sukhasana.

www.doyoga.com/updat...revisited_update.pdf

www.yogatic.com/yoga...ciples-of-alignment/

I know for me that I've had to work a LOT on foot strength and flexibility. It's coming, little by little. It's been so exciting to me to start seeing some movement in my tarsal-metatarsal joints, that had been completely locked.

It's a fine line, too - especially with your history of pushing too far - but for me, yoga brings blood, lymph and healing to injured areas like no other workout does. There's a kind of ouch I can tell is good, but there's definitely an ouch to avoid, too, and you're probably best avoiding anything that hurts.

I will check out the links, thank you! I need to find a different way of approaching these things and am trying to learn from my past mistakes - especially from last fall. I know that I have flexibility issues with both hips and feet - I hadn't thought that this might be able to help both of them!

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