Sports FAQ
Home / Bike Health

Trigger Point Dry Needling

Wahine2012-01-24 22:12:17 +0000 #1
Have any of you had Trigger Point Dry Needling (TDN) as a treatment for musculoskeletal problems?

Would you be willing to share your opinion on the technique? Was it helpful? Would you have it done again?

I am trained in TDN, but currently in the state of OR the Acupuncture community is lobbying very hard to disallow the use of this technique by Physical Therapists. I would like very much to continue to use the techniqes in treatment but I'm trying to decide how hard I want to fight for this priviledge. It would be helpful to hear some things from consumers/patients.

Thanks in advance for any input.
salsabike2012-01-24 22:16:13 +0000 #2
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wahine

Have any of you had Trigger Point Dry Needling (TDN) as a treatment for musculoskeletal problems?

Would you be willing to share your opinion on the technique? Was it helpful? Would you have it done again?

I am trained in TDN, but currently in the state of OR the Acupuncture community is lobbying very hard to disallow the use of this technique by Physical Therapists. I would like very much to continue to use the techniqes in treatment but I'm trying to decide how hard I want to fight for this priviledge. It would be helpful to hear some things from consumers/patients.

Thanks in advance for any input.

Yes, I have. When I was first diagnosed with fibromyalgia in the early 90s, I used to see a physician who was a pain specialist, Dr. Anders Sola, a really lovely man in his 70s---chapters in pain textbooks all over the world. He did this technique himself. I have said for 20+ years that the only things that helped with the severe muscle pain I had in the first decade were acupuncture (specifically the technique you refer to) and ice bags (except for the medication that caused all the weight gain and thus was not a sustainable approach).
jessmarimba2012-01-24 22:42:20 +0000 #3
I had it done once by someone who was not very skilled. Most of the points were ok, but he managed to hit a spot on the arch of each foot that caused my feet to swell up and bruise for a few days. Since I went to him to help pain caused by running and was unable to walk for a day or two after my visit, I was pretty unhappy. But I imagine the right person could do some good.
Biciclista2012-01-24 23:11:27 +0000 #4
I had a PT guy work my trigger points especially for my frozen shoulder, but not with needles. I am inserting myself into this conversation because of Donald. his body (which has been seriously wounded several times over the last few months) has kind of frozen in some places. he can't move his right shoulder back to where it belongs and his back is a little hunched. I am most worried about his arms and shoulders as they are in pretty bad shape. Dry needling sounds painful. i have been doing light massage to some of his trigger points and am wondering who around here (seattle) can work with this stuff without causing him a lot of pain.
salsabike2012-01-24 23:59:02 +0000 #5
Mimi, it is not painful. It really isn't.
Biciclista2012-01-25 00:36:35 +0000 #6
our insurance won't pay for it anyway. We made an appt with the acupuncturist we like.
Wahine2012-01-24 22:36:18 +0000 #7
Trigger point dry needling can be painful depending on how it's done and what the goals are. I'm usually treating athletes, so the technique is perhaps a bit more aggressive. It is definitely very different from acupuncture. The sensation during the technique can be achy, but it usually feels like an "ah there" kind of ache. And you can have a feeling afterward of the muscle groups treated having a post-exercise type of achiness for a day or two.

Acupuncture in generally pretty painless, but may not get the release of tissue that Mimi is looking for.

Mimi, is there any chance that Don could go to a PT to help with getting him on a light stretching and posture program? That might be the place to start. Massaging the trigger points is a really good thing too, especially if he can move around a bit afterward and stretch into the limits of his range of motion.
Biciclista2012-01-24 22:43:29 +0000 #8
i will talk to him about this.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wahine

Mimi, is there any chance that Don could go to a PT to help with getting him on a light stretching and posture program? That might be the place to start. Massaging the trigger points is a really good thing too, especially if he can move around a bit afterward and stretch into the limits of his range of motion.

I noticed an improvement in 24 hours after i worked the pressure points along his mid spine but am less confident around the shoulders... and he doesn't have a lot of confidence in me either. We had a guy who did this kind of stuff (Hellerwork) but he continued to hurt Donald so much that he won't go back. For me, the pain was welcome because of the results, but for D, it was a much less positive experience.

Reply

Name:
Content:


Other posts in this category