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Hmm... upgrade would help?

carriesn2010-04-29 01:14:13 +0000 #1
Hi guys. I used to have a Specialized Allez SE bike with a Shimano 105 group. I always had trouble going from 2nd to granny gear (chain would slip off). Long story short, I sold that bike and got a Specialized Dolce Comp which came with the same Shimano 105 group. Same problem (I didnt change the bike because of chain issue LOL )... my partner has Ultegra and this issue never happens to her (Both of my bikes had triple crankset, hers' a double comp).

I was wondering if I upgraded a couple of components to Ultegra, if this slipping chain problem when shifting gears would go away? Any opinions? And if yes, what components would need to be replaced?

Im an idiot when it comes to this kind of stuff... I just like hopping on the bike and riding it! I bring bus money in case of flats instead of tube repair stuff
Savra2010-04-29 01:16:34 +0000 #2
I had a similiar problem with my Specialized Dolce Elite with the same Shimona set up you are talking about. The chain fell off when I went from granny to second. I took it to my LBS and insisted they ride it and see what it did (I had already taken it in three times by then and I think they thought I was crazy). They finally realized it was a problem when they took it for a ride and so decided to keep my bike until it was fixed. The thing was, it wouldn't do it when they put it on the rack. You had to be riding it for the problem to occur. Any hoo - they were finally able to fix the problem. I don't know how exactly but chain hasn't fallen off lately so I'm pleased.

I should add I've only been able to ride 10 miles since it as fixed and then promptly sprained my ankle but it was working very nicely before said injury.
indysteel2010-04-29 01:38:16 +0000 #3
The upgrade won't necessarily solve the problem. The mechanics of a front derailleur are pretty simple, which is why prebuilt bikes often use a lesser "quality" front derailleur, i.e., a 105 front d/r, while the rest of the components are Ultegra. Take it to your shop, explain the problem and ask them to make sure the front derailleur is adjusted properly. Triples definitely have their advantages, but shifting between chainrings can more trickier. I had problems last year, usually shifting from my little to middle chainring. Since it was tuned up over the winter, however, my shifting has been very smooth.
Becky2010-04-29 01:41:23 +0000 #4
Ditto what Indy said. Without seeing the bike, it's hard to say for sure, but it sounds like a mis-adjusted low limit screw on the OP's bike.

Has your shop taken a look at it?
DebW2010-04-29 02:36:42 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by indysteel

The upgrade won't necessarily solve the problem. The mechanics of a front derailleur are pretty simple, which is why prebuilt bikes often use a lesser "quality" front derailleur, i.e., a 105 front d/r, while the rest of the components are Ultegra.

My "industry sources" say the opposite. Even fairly cheap rear derailleurs shifts well because the shifter acts on the unloaded side of the chain. A drivetrain would operate better with a lesser quality RD and a higher quality FD (and crankset). Bikes aren't sold that way due to marketing considerations - the RD catches people's eye and it's model number becomes associated with the whole drivetrain. So put a 105 RD on a bike with otherwise cheaper components and it sells better at a given price point.

Nevertheless, some words of advice for carriesn. Put your bike in it's lowest gear (inside rear cog, smallest chainring) and observe the gap between the chain and the inside of the front derailleur plate. It should be only 0.5 mm on a 10-speed system, up to 1 mm on a 9-speed system. If it's greater than that, take it back to your LBS for a better adjustment. Also, observe the angle of the outer plate on the derailleur. It should be parallel to the chainrings (comparing to the largest chainring is easiest). In terms of usage, keep track on what rear cog the chain was on when a FD shift results in a dropped chain. If it's only certain cogs, you could learn to avoid a FD shift in those cogs (not ideal and not foolproof, but may save some headaches). It could be that upgrading to Ultegra would make you very happy.

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