Sports FAQ
Home / Bike Maintenance

Tips for getting the wheel back on?

Owlie2010-12-12 12:08:45 +0000 #1
Clearly, I'm doing it wrong, as every time I've tried putting the wheel back on, it's off-center. It likes to hang up on the brakes (easy), and then on the little cone-shaped nut thing. Even if I remove it, it still hangs up slightly forward of where it should be. Tips for easy wheel maneuvering?

TIA.
Becky2010-12-12 12:13:09 +0000 #2
Are you shifting to the smallest cog before you remove the rear wheel? I find that shifting up before removing the wheel makes it much easier to know where the chain goes when the wheel is re-installed
Owlie2010-12-12 12:15:33 +0000 #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by Becky

Are you shifting to the smallest cog before you remove the rear wheel? I find that shifting up before removing the wheel makes it much easier to know where the chain goes when the wheel is re-installed

Yes. It's not hanging on the chain/derailleur. Instead, it's almost like the dropouts are catching on the "screw" parts that correspond to the quick release and the cone-nut-thing.
laura*2010-12-12 13:23:15 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by Owlie

It likes to hang up on the brakes (easy)

Are you releasing the brakes? Many brake mechanisms have a way of temporarily releasing the brake cable's pull allowing the pads to swing out, thus clearing your tire. Mountain canti's and V-brakes will unhook, while road calipers may have a lever to twist.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Owlie

Instead, it's almost like the dropouts are catching on the "screw" parts that correspond to the quick release and the cone-nut-thing.

Perhaps your frame spacing is slightly too narrow? Some frames need to be gently spread to fit a wheel back in.

Does your quick release have the two springs? (Narrow ends toward the axle ends, wide ends toward the QR mechanism and nut.) These springs push the QR parts away from the frame dropouts.
Owlie2010-12-12 13:35:19 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by laura*

Are you releasing the brakes? Many brake mechanisms have a way of temporarily releasing the brake cable's pull allowing the pads to swing out, thus clearing your tire. Mountain canti's and V-brakes will unhook, while road calipers may have a lever to twist.

Perhaps your frame spacing is slightly too narrow? Some frames need to be gently spread to fit a wheel back in.

Does your quick release have the two springs? (Narrow ends toward the axle ends, wide ends toward the QR mechanism and nut.) These springs push the QR parts away from the frame dropouts.

The tires that the bike came with are slightly too wide for the brakes, so it'll hang up even with the brakes open. Easily dealt with--just give it a bit of an extra shove.

The QR does have springs.

The reason I'm guessing that the wheel isn't sitting neatly in the dropouts is because I end up with brake one shoe or the other rubbing. I'm not sure I should need to hold the wheel in place to (try) to prevent this!
OakLeaf2010-12-12 13:55:42 +0000 #6
Don't rely on your brakes to tell you whether the wheel is centered, since the brake often gets knocked to one side or the other when the wheel is off.

Have the bike upright, balanced on the front wheel. Put the wheel between the chainstays and the tire between the brake pads and get the chain into position. Hold the bike by the seat stays as you pull the wheel back into the dropouts. You should have to gently spread the dropouts by a mm or two. Once the QR is between the dropouts, put the wheel on the ground, grab it directly behind the chainstays and pull it straight back until you can feel it seat on both sides.

After you set the quick-release in the drop-outs, tighten it, then inflate the tire and then eyeball the rim in the chainstays near the bottom bracket. If it's off-center, then repeat the last step until it looks good. NOW check whether your brakes are centered. If they're off, re-center the caliper, spin the wheel, apply the brake, and make sure they're still centered.

Remember that late-model drop-outs have that little tab that means you will have to unscrew the quick-release to get the wheel off, and screw it back down to secure the wheel when you install it. You will have to do this by feel - the QR should be very tight, pretty much as tight as still allows you to throw the lever without totally wrestling with it. It should leave a mark in your hand.

Reply

Name:
Content:


Other posts in this category