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Tight Tires

Roadtrip2012-02-24 08:26:18 +0000 #1
Anyone else have trouble with really tight tires when trying to get the bead set after changing a flat? Is there a correct way to get them back on?? I know your not supposed to use the tool to get the tire on, but I just can't do it without ripping my hands to shreds on the wire bead. This time I just used the tire lever to get the dang thing back on, and even that was a pain, so any advice is much welcome.

Shannon
westtexas2012-02-24 08:41:27 +0000 #2
Everytime I use the tire lever to get the tire back on, I end up ripping a hole in the tube and have to start all over again. It's hard to do, I agree, especially if you have crappy hand strength!!!

The trick I figured out for myself was to always wear cycling gloves. I then use the grippy parts of the gloves on my palms to help me grip the tire as I roll it up into the rim. It can be difficult but you can work it in slowly one little bit at a time until it just snaps right back in. I've done it about 5 times now that way and it gets easier every time (I get lots of flats out here, even with tire liners and properly inflated tires).
OakLeaf2012-02-24 08:51:51 +0000 #3
I know it's not by the book, but I almost always use a lever to mount my tires.

Make sure there's a bit of air in the tube, enough to give it some shape, before you start. Check carefully that the tube is inside the tire at each point before applying pressure to the lever.

Once the bead is on the rim, work it all around and check that it's seated.

Inflate the tire about halfway and check it again.

Then let all the air out of the tube, work the bead all around the tire once more, and finally inflate it to pressure.

If I follow all those steps and don't cheat, I've never had a pinch.

It probably takes longer than doing it with your hands, but it sure is easier.

I think plastic levers are less likely to grab the tube than metal, also.
radacrider2012-02-24 08:55:43 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by OakLeaf

I know it's not by the book, but I almost always use a lever to mount my tires.

Make sure there's a bit of air in the tube, enough to give it some shape, before you start. Check carefully that the tube is inside the tire at each point before applying pressure to the lever.

Once the bead is on the rim, work it all around and check that it's seated.

Inflate the tire about halfway and check it again.

Then let all the air out of the tube, work the bead all around the tire once more, and finally inflate it to pressure.

If I follow all those steps and don't cheat, I've never had a pinch.

It probably takes longer than doing it with your hands, but it sure is easier.

I think plastic levers are less likely to grab the tube than metal, also.

+1 - this is what I do. If I am at home, I sometimes use a little dish soap and water on the bead to help it slide on a bit easier, too. ( rules were meant to be broken - is my motto. Do what works.)
Eden2012-02-24 09:15:25 +0000 #5
Couple of suggestions -

Try a different brand of tire next time - some tire-rim combos seem to work better than others - a folding (kevlar) bead might be easier, but not necessarily... I've had *super* tight folders.

Keep your gloves on (or use a rag) and use your palms to push against the bead - helps save the skin on your hands.

If you have time, you can work to stretch the bead out a bit (and hopefully after the tire has been on the rim for a while it will stretch a bit too)

I'm with the others - I've used levers to get the tire back on with tight ones. I haven't had a problem with pinching the tube. I really like my Pedros levers - they are very rounded and not apt to tear up tubes.
SadieKate2012-02-24 10:44:00 +0000 #6
I'm with Eden. Some rim-tire combos don't play well together.
Becky2012-02-24 09:35:47 +0000 #7
Another vote for the Pedros levers here.
Crankin2012-02-24 08:55:20 +0000 #8
The trick is to use your palms on that last part that needs to go in. Press your palms against the tire, loop your fingers around the top of the wheel, and apply pressure so you are rolling your palms up and down/back and forth. I'm not a whiz when it comes to other parts of the process, but I have helped more than a few experienced riders who were having trouble with this.

The Pedro levers are the best, but I've never used them for putting the tire back on. And some tires are just easier than others to work with. A friend just asked me why I didn't have a certain brand of "flat proof" tires and I responded that if I did get a flat, I'd never be able to get those tires on or off. I've found Contis or Shwalbes are much easier than others.

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