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Help adding a manual switch to turn on my fan.

Sinned2010-05-17 14:58:11 +0000 #1
I have noticed that my fan will not come on at any point. I keep it cool by moving quickly.

Problem is I am now using my bike to commute again and that means stop and go traffic and higher engine heat.

I have a 2006 Kawasaki Nina 250cc. (US model)

The fan apparently works. I assume its the thermostat that doesn't. I don't want to just replace the thermostat. I would really like to add this manual switch for full control.

Can anyone offer up any advise or assistance on what I need to do to install a manual switch?

Thanks
Shovelhead2010-05-17 15:00:47 +0000 #2
Ok,

First of all, relying on a manual switch to keep your engine cool is not a good idea.

If you want to put a switch, put a jumper (switched) from both wires of your thermostat, therefore closing the circuit.

Extremely easy.
CHIA2010-05-17 15:26:32 +0000 #3
Ya, I would agree....the thermostat controlled switch is set to come on a certain temp, when it's best for the engine......you don't know when that is.
bc-lefty2010-05-17 15:25:16 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by CHIA

Ya, I would agree....the thermostat controlled switch is set to come on a certain temp, when it's best for the engine......you don't know when that is.

True, but when those thermostats become unreliable, they're useless.

The thermostat on my FZ750 was totally pooched, so I had a manual switch to turn on the fan. Combined with the temp gauge that bike had, it was really handy, as I could turn the fan on when I knew I'd be doing lots of stop and go even before the temp hit the redline.

I could turn it off when I was idling so I didn't drain the battery, too

EDIT: A bypass jumper switch is even better, as then you have both control AND the function of the thermostat
kerunt2010-05-17 16:16:35 +0000 #5
How about wiring in a switch parallel to the thermostat? With the switch off, the thermostat would be responsible for completing the circuit and running the fan. With the switch on, the fan would always be on, regardless of what the thermostat is/not doing.
Shovelhead2010-05-17 17:26:05 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by kerunt

How about wiring in a switch parallel to the thermostat? With the switch off, the thermostat would be responsible for completing the circuit and running the fan. With the switch on, the fan would always be on, regardless of what the thermostat is/not doing.

That's exactly what I was suggesting.

splice an extra wire from both ends of your thermostat and put a switch on it.

So it is a "manual" override.
Sinned2010-05-17 17:40:15 +0000 #7
I'm pretty handy but I'm a dummy that wants to do this right. Can someone draw this up for me?

What guage of wire should I be using?
Locksmith2010-05-17 15:44:46 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sinned

I'm pretty handy but I'm a dummy that wants to do this right. Can someone draw this up for me?

What guage of wire should I be using?

Are you going to be at the work related meeting on Tuesday? Ask me, I'll show you.

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