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re-spring, re-valve 2009 R1.. need some clarification..

bacchus402011-04-19 07:19:17 +0000 #1
aight so i'll jump right into it..

i recently fell into a pretty good deal on a set of

OHLINS FORK PISTON {re-valve} KIT for my 2009 YZF-R1, i've done my homework

and i will be purchasing a set of GRAVES {OHLINS} FORK SPRING KIT, running

custom spring rate for my weight obviously...

now this package is gonna cost me something silly like 4 billz.. not bad i says!!

so of course i am now considering the rear shock... but there's no way in hell i'm gonna blow 1300 bucks on a TTX Ohlins rear shock

so i am looking at RACE-TECH to get a hold of a custom rate spring and a re-valve kit to somewhat approach the setup in the forks...

my question is this.. is there any adverse effect from mis-matching suspension setup like this... is a spring is a spring is a spring!??

the rear shock set up will probably be a couple billz as well so yeh i'm pretty happy with a 600 buck suspension upgrade..

comments/ rants!???

thanks!

mandatory pics!






5thgear2011-04-19 07:33:16 +0000 #2
I would say not a huge difference . Spring for weight should be the same unless it's dual or triple rate . That's the best part of suspension tuning . Tune until it's perfect
bacchus402011-04-19 08:02:53 +0000 #3
thanks Bill, thats what i figured, i'm sure both race-tech and Graves know what they're doing and will help me find a proper spring rate for my needs... its not a huge difference in spring rates, just a little tweaking..

its not like i'm gonna be doing track days or anything crazy, just wanna settle the beast down when i'm out in the Canyon...

yeh instead of blowing out cash on power mods that give you 1 to 5 hp up top... i' think this year i'll concentrate on the whole package... suspension is a big factor in getting the new R1 to really perform
Coastmaster2011-04-19 08:01:07 +0000 #4
See Rod at RMR for great work and great advice. My personal experience with him is excellent.
CHIA2011-04-19 07:49:09 +0000 #5
You may want to PM or email Blair of SV Racing, for Racetech deals, he's tough to beat, and offers top notch service.
dasein2011-04-19 09:08:20 +0000 #6
Guys on the WERA forum tend to diss this kit. They like the 25 mil Ohlins cartridge kit, and are reluctant to embrace the 30 mil Ohlins kit (new stuff).

I think this would be fine for street, but if I were you, I would go full Race Tech. Same idea, save people really rave about the design of the GR2 compression valve. Key word: digressive damping, if you want it.

Less money, also. I put it in my ZX10, I was very happy.

I have a GP 25 cartridge in my ZX6, have not ridden it yet, but I expect supremeness. Mostly cause the carts I bought were very fast in another bike.

That is a good advantage of buying used race stuff: if you buy from a winner, you are getting a starting point that cannot be too far from the mark... for race, that is. Don't know how plush you like your street ride to be.

As to your matching question, I will be running Ohlins rear and GP Suspension front this year. Not worried about it. GP Does not make shocks, neither did race tech till recently, and many many people have given their stuff love.

There are a lot of fast guys running the race tech 25 mil cartridge on the WERA forum. Ohlins is good, but don't get sucked into a brand name... and buy your spring used. A spring is a spring is a spring is a spring.... for the most part.

Remember your goal is, as Bill said, to tune till it is perfect. First after springs, get valving that allows meaningful adjustment in the speed range you ride. Then dial and dial. Don't be afraid to go up or down a shim stack after a season... that is the beauty of the race tk kit in my 10: instructions on how to make all the stacks came with it. too harsh with all your compression dialed out: build the next softest stack. And so on. Just throwing valves in it is not a ton of use unless you are willing to twiddle the knobs. Dave Moss has a pretty accessible series on how to get into this.

And do the track day. Your mom could do it. Nothing to be afraid of.
rmrsusp2011-04-19 08:32:48 +0000 #7
Just some info to think about.

Not saying the Race Tech is not worth the money, cause they have there place. But the thing is that when your forks get built professionally and I mean not just adding a kit and reading some shim stack codes or taking a Ohlins piston kit and putting it straight in. They get custom tailored with extra hands on experience, testing and racing. The idea is to get feel out of the front tire into your hands to know your limits. When building a good set of forks for race or street it's not a lot different. Yes spring rates and oil heights change but good quality valving is similar. There are different tricks that go along with a good susp tech.

So all in all when making you decision on what forks, cartridges or valving you want to put in do some more home work on who is doing the work and what quality and knowledge the person or company has. Not so your forks or shock are better the what they started out as being but to the best they can be. As quoted from Paul Thed "The best you know is the best you've ridden"

Also if it was as easy as buying a valve kit and reading a chart for your weight and riding style do you think that all the suspension Company's would be still in business? Just figure out what quality of work do you want.

Just my 2 cents.
dasein2011-04-19 10:12:24 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by rmrsusp

Just some info to think about.

Not saying the Race Tech is not worth the money, cause they have there place. But the thing is that when your forks get built professionally and I mean not just adding a kit and reading some shim stack codes or taking a Ohlins piston kit and putting it straight in. They get custom tailored with extra hands on experience, testing and racing. The idea is to get feel out of the front tire into your hands to know your limits. When building a good set of forks for race or street it's not a lot different. Yes spring rates and oil heights change but good quality valving is similar. There are different tricks that go along with a good susp tech.

So all in all when making you decision on what forks, cartridges or valving you want to put in do some more home work on who is doing the work and what quality and knowledge the person or company has. Not so your forks or shock are better the what they started out as being but to the best they can be. As quoted from Paul Thed "The best you know is the best you've ridden"

Also if it was as easy as buying a valve kit and reading a chart for your weight and riding style do you think that all the suspension Company's would be still in business? Just figure out what quality of work do you want.

Just my 2 cents.

Ha. You saying my work is not quality? Wrong.

I am sure that when race tech tells you how to put their kit in, they do not leave anything out. I am sure there are tricks that make your job easier, but I put in my own cartridges and springs in my forks and my shock on the ZX10 and... it rides damn good. And I have ridden a few bikes in my time.

Buying a valve kit, and setting it up according to a chart that considers your riding style, weight, and tire stiffness is the first step, as I said above. You don't do anything different.

Not everyone is willing to spend the time to understand how their suspension works, or how to tune it. Not everyone has the mechanical aptitude or interest to tear apart their own shocks.

But there is no black magic, people, no matter what the "gurus" say. All the info you need can be had. The results can come from a stopwatch.

It is a complex topic, so get ready to twist your brain a little... but figuring it out for yourself will make you a better rider, IMHO.

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