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Moratti Scoffs At Milan Becks Move

Gunner2010-05-04 18:23:56 +0000 #1
Inter president Massimo Moratti has laughed upon Milan's move for David Beckham and he has compared it to when the Rossoneri signed Christian Vieri and Ronaldo, who both turned out to be flops...



The San Siro-based club confirmed the arrival of the Englishman on Wednesday morning and Beckham will begin playing for them in January.

The move has been a surprise for most but a delight for Milan fans.

However, bitter rivals Inter couldn't help themselves from pouring scorn on the deal and Moratti has criticised the 'cousins' from across town.

"Beckham to Milan? It's a Ronaldo type deal," laughed Moratti as he spoke to Sportmediaset.

"Milan have this philosophy which started when they bought Vieri, it continued with Ronaldo, Ronaldinho and now Beckham.



"I guess there is nothing wrong in signing these players as it could be fun for their fans.

"We have taken a different approach when signing players. We can't have two different ways of working.

"In any case we will see which team has done best at the end of the year."

The Rossoneri are just three points behind league leaders Inter and it is likely to be a two horse race between them for the Scudetto.


Gunner2010-05-04 18:36:28 +0000 #2
I cant believe Moratti is saying that about Vieri. He was a great player for Inter from what i can remember. And we all know Ronaldinho has issues in his personal life but he is a great asset to any team.

Id like to remind Moratti at how many people he is signing over 30. Vieira, Figo, etc they were all past their best. And the disrespect towards some of the best football players around says a lot about Moratti really.
Sebastian2010-05-04 19:13:02 +0000 #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gunner

I cant believe Moratti is saying that about Vieri. He was a great player for Inter from what i can remember. And we all know Ronaldinho has issues in his personal life but he is a great asset to any team.

You cant remember,because you started watching seria A highlights just recently...Vieri in Milan was the biggest flop imaginable...

No highlights for that one...

As for Ronaldinho,you were the one that claimed that he is finished,just some time ago...Everyone saw that...

The past is something that you shouldn't go in...
Sebastian2010-05-04 19:40:16 +0000 #4
You are constantly provoking in this forum and Valdanito has really a point there...

You do nothing but whine like a little kid and post nothing but negative insinuations and provocative comments on Inter...

Keep it up...

Vieira was one of the best mid fielders on the planet when Inter signed him from Juventus...While Figo is a player like Zidane...

This is the best right wing in the history of football(tied with Garrincha,i cant made up my mind there).

If you compare Figo with the likes of Vieri and Beckham,even now,then you are clearly delusional...
Gunner2010-05-04 18:49:36 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sebastian

You cant remember,because you started watching seria A highlights just recently...Vieri in Milan was the biggest flop imaginable...

The past is something that you shouldn't go in...

U missed the point. Were talking about Moratti insulting a player who once played for Moratti, and you are also insulting the former Inter player. Man lol.. ive heard everything i needed to hear today.

And i must admit i dont follow serie a, but i have always watched the highlights of the derbys and big games. yes, even from back when vieri & recoba were part of your team.

As for you buying Viera when he was at his best?

thats laughable.. Viera was on a different level when he played for Arsenal, you just have to look at highlights, He isnt anything like he was, not at inter, or juventus. He was like the cristiano ronaldo of the central midfield position when he was at Arsenal. Seriously, not anywhere near the same level he was.. anyone will tell you that.
ilcapitano2010-05-04 19:02:20 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gunner

U missed the point. Were talking about Moratti insulting a player who once played for Moratti, and you are also insulting the former Inter player. Man lol.. ive heard everything i needed to hear today.

What was your source on this?

It's funny to see how different articles people produce from the same statement or interview.

Here's channel4 article yesterday and Moratti doesn't seem so disrespectful:

Moratti 'wouldn't have signed Becks'

Thursday 23 October, 2008

Inter chief Massimo Moratti has sniped at Milan's decision to sign David Beckham on loan. "Their philosophy is different to ours."

The news that the Rossoneri have swooped for the 33-year-old has divided opinion in the peninsula.

While there has been widespread enthusiasm for the move, some pundits have accused Diavolo Vice-President Adriano Galliani of putting commercial interests first.

“The Beckham deal is part of philosophy that Milan began when they brought in Christian Vieri, then Ronaldo and Ronaldinho,” Moratti told La Gazzetta dello Sport.

“It's a road that a big club can go down and it can deliver entertainment to the public.

“However, we are choosing to go down a different road and you can't mix and match philosophies.

“We will have to wait until the end of the season to see which path works better.”
~zero_signal~2010-05-04 21:12:25 +0000 #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sebastian

...While Figo is a player like Zidane...

This is the best right wing in the history of football(tied with Garrincha,i cant made up my mind there).

Hmmm ... You're right with your comparisons of quality. I like both, although they played in different times. I'd go for Garrincha -- contrary to popular belief, this guy and not Pele, is the greatest footballer in the history of Brazilian football. If I had to create a best 11 football team, I'd have Garrincha as one of the wingers, alongside Marco van Basten, the centre forward.

But, Figo is nothing short of great. He's a master, and one of the players I admire from Inter. My favourite at Inter is Chivu, although I respect Javier Zanetti a lot too.
Gunner2010-05-04 21:51:56 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by ilcapitano

What was your source on this?

It's funny to see how different articles people produce from the same statement or interview.

Here's channel4 article yesterday and Moratti doesn't seem so disrespectful:

Moratti 'wouldn't have signed Becks'

Thursday 23 October, 2008

Inter chief Massimo Moratti has sniped at Milan's decision to sign David Beckham on loan. "Their philosophy is different to ours."

The news that the Rossoneri have swooped for the 33-year-old has divided opinion in the peninsula.

While there has been widespread enthusiasm for the move, some pundits have accused Diavolo Vice-President Adriano Galliani of putting commercial interests first.

“The Beckham deal is part of philosophy that Milan began when they brought in Christian Vieri, then Ronaldo and Ronaldinho,” Moratti told La Gazzetta dello Sport.

“It's a road that a big club can go down and it can deliver entertainment to the public.

“However, we are choosing to go down a different road and you can't mix and match philosophies.

“We will have to wait until the end of the season to see which path works better.”

Well who knows. When i read the article i saw i was disgusted. Moratti maybe shouldnt even speak about whos phylosophy works best, I think Milans problems go deeper than just the players they sign sometimes and Moratti is using it as another excuse to have a dig at Milan who are in a crisis.

If you read this article you will see exactly why Milan do this, financially they are in a real bad way.

Italy’s Crisis Has Premier Riding High

ROME — This month, as markets plummeted and investors panicked, Italy’s billionaire prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, watched shares in some of his own companies nose-dive 40 percent. Yet he seemed buoyant as ever, reveling until dawn at a disco in Milan after returning from a meeting with European leaders on how to tackle the financial crisis.

ROME — This month, as markets plummeted and investors panicked, Italy’s billionaire prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, watched shares in some of his own companies nose-dive 40 percent. Yet he seemed buoyant as ever, reveling until dawn at a disco in Milan after returning from a meeting with European leaders on how to tackle the financial crisis.

But worry about the power of Mr. Berlusconi and his government is high enough that on Monday Mr. Tremonti sought to play down fears of more state intervention. He said the government would approach any bailouts reluctantly, saying they could be “seriously harmful” to the country’s “political health.”

Mr. Tremonti also has a strong hand with the parties in the center-right coalition and helped push through some budget measures over the summer, giving the government more flexibility in the current crisis. Budget negotiations usually paralyze Parliament all fall.

But not everyone is convinced.

For all Mr. Tremonti’s foresight, “the budget was wrong because it presupposed growth,” said Pier Luigi Bersani, the shadow finance minister for the Democrats. On Tuesday, the International Monetary Fund predicted two years of recession for Italy. Last week, Confindustria predicted that the Italian economy would shrink by 0.5 percent, instead of growing 0.4 percent.

It is hard to gauge how much Mr. Berlusconi’s empire has lost. His holding company, Fininvest, which is not publicly traded, announced Tuesday that its net profit had fallen 20 percent this year. Shares in Mediaset have fallen 40 percent since the first of the year, while Mondadori, a publishing house, is down nearly half. Shares in Mediolanum, an insurance company, were down about 40 percent.

But in broad terms, Mr. Berlusconi has solidified his position in Italy’s economy, the world’s seventh largest.

His daughter Marina now sits on the board of Mediobanca, the storied Milan investment bank that for decades was a counterbalance to state financing and a bastion of old money to his new.

Mr. Berlusconi recently warned that Italian companies were open to hostile takeovers, and he hopes to pass a law making them more difficult. His critics fear such a law would reduce foreign investment, keeping power in the hands of a homegrown few.

“Hostile to whom?” the left-leaning economist Tito Boeri asked in a front-page article in La Repubblica on Friday. “Hostile to our economy or to the big families that now run Italian capitalism?”

And as the credit crisis deepens, Mr. Berlusconi is also moving closer to the country’s two leading investment banks, Unicredit and Intesa Sanpaolo, whose leaders have not been close to the center-right coalition.

At Mr. Berlusconi’s behest, the chief executive of Intesa Sanpaolo, Corrado Passera, worked with the government to engineer the recent bailout of the airline Alitalia. Mr. Berlusconi had pledged during his election campaign to keep the flagship carrier Italian, which meant nationalizing the airline’s losses while trading favors to get private investors to buy a major stake.

Unicredit’s shares have plummeted in recent weeks, but it has so far avoided the need for help from the state. Last week, the government of Libya bought a 5 percent stake, becoming the bank’s second largest shareholder.

If private recapitalization fails and Unicredit turns to Mr. Berlusconi for state financing, it would wind up “reducing the independence of these very important banks that had previously been out of his grasp,” said Michele Polo, an economics professor at Bocconi University in Milan.

Is all this power for Mr. Berlusconi good for the country?

“My immediate response is yes,” said Alberto Bombassei, vice president of Confindustria. “In difficult moments it’s good for the country to have a more decisive government.”

Beyond the economic uncertainty, Mr. Berlusconi, who seems to enjoy life on the precipice, still remains vulnerable. He is on trial in absentia in Milan, accused of concealing illegal accounts. Italy’s constitutional court is reviewing a law that would grant him immunity.

Paolo Bonaiuti, Mr. Berlusconi’s spokesman, said reports of the prime minister’s increased power were overstated. “He has the support of the public,” Mr. Bonaiuti said. “What’s the problem?”

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Before you start having a go at me, this is just an article i read and it is an interesting read. It has nothing to do with me having a dig at Serie A, its about Milans financial crisis and what they are doing to get ot of it.

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