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Spinning Music Decible Levels, Tinnitus

Miranda2010-05-02 17:12:00 +0000 #1
I know we have some other spin instructors on this forum. Looking for some info on acceptable music decible levels in class.

I have not taught class yet, but am certified. Been spinning for a couple years.

I dug thru my Spinning Manual, and if this answer is in there, don't see it off hand. What is the acceptable volume level for music in decibles?

I have a problem. I am waiting an appt with an ENT doc specialist to discuss hearing loss. I have tinnitus (ringing in the ears) that I hear consistently. It varies in volume. Sometimes it difficult to doze off to sleep at night due to it. I've been like this a while now that I really think about it. Time seems to pass quickly.

I think after a while if you have something consistenly wrong with you, your perception of what's "normal" changes. I have difficulty hearing some conversations, and just thought it was too much background noise or something. But now I'm pretty sure it's otherwise.

Part of what stirred this up... I am starting to learn how to play a musical instrument, and the safety issue of wearing hearing protection came to my attention... and the subject of tinnitus.

Never thought as much about it until then. From what I read, it's a permanent type of damage. Makes me so sad.

We do not have decible level devices on our gym stero equipment, and I know that the volume has got to be outrageous in our most popular teachers classes. The one teacher that keeps a lower level volume gets gossiped about as being a "stick in the mud" for turning down the crank it up fun. Now realizing, she's the only smart one.

Any feedback on this subject welcomed. Thx, ladies!


mimitabby2010-05-02 17:24:24 +0000 #2
worked in hearing conservation for a few years. Not sure what you're asking but 80 dBA for 8 hours gives some people a hearing loss. That's the same as 85 dBA for 4 hours or 90 dBA (A-weighted) for 2 hours.

THe fact as an instructor you'll also be yelling OVER the music won't help either. So put the speakers AWAY from you and don't turn them up too loud.

Some of your students don't like the music that loud anyway.
tulip2010-05-02 17:50:00 +0000 #3
I've thought about wearing earplugs in some spin classes. Not only is the volume too high, the music is not to my liking (okay, it sucks. I hate that electronica stuff).
Miranda2010-05-02 18:03:00 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by mimitabby

worked in hearing conservation for a few years. Not sure what you're asking but 80 dBA for 8 hours gives some people a hearing loss. That's the same as 85 dBA for 4 hours or 90 dBA (A-weighted) for 2 hours.

THe fact as an instructor you'll also be yelling OVER the music won't help either. So put the speakers AWAY from you and don't turn them up too loud.

Some of your students don't like the music that loud anyway.

It seems like I remember the trainer that taught the instructor's class (she was outta town, not from our gym) had a rating of what was deemed as acceptable decible level in class. Might have her email somewhere, or sending one to the spin program directly.

Realize other factors contribute the overal accumulative effect of hearing loss... like what you do at work, etc.

I almost feel like it's a bit worse in my left ear. As an outdoor road cyclists as well, I plan to ask the ENT doc if the noise exposure of vehicels passing you on the left side next to that ear (for those of you in the US, right side of road driving, cars/loud trucks/motorcycles etc. going around you on the left) could attribute to the overall effect.

When I teach, my classes will be within whatever the said acceptable level is. Frankly, I plan to bring the issue up to the management thinking about it more. Thx for the thoughts.
Zen2010-05-02 17:39:18 +0000 #5
Put on Red Hot Chili Peppers and crank it to 11
mimitabby2010-05-02 17:32:24 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by Miranda

It seems like I remember the trainer that taught the instructor's class (she was outta town, not from our gym) had a rating of what was deemed as acceptable decible level in class. Might have her email somewhere, or sending one to the spin program directly.

Realize other factors contribute the overal accumulative effect of hearing loss... like what you do at work, etc.

I almost feel like it's a bit worse in my left ear. As an outdoor road cyclists as well, I plan to ask the ENT doc if the noise exposure of vehicels passing you on the left side next to that ear (for those of you in the US, right side of road driving, cars/loud trucks/motorcycles etc. going around you on the left) could attribute to the overall effect.

When I teach, my classes will be within whatever the said acceptable level is. Frankly, I plan to bring the issue up to the management thinking about it more. Thx for the thoughts.

How are you measuring the noise level?

If you ride where there are lots of cars passing you, you bet it is going to affect you.

Hearing loss can be proven from just attending 1 rock concert!

wear earplugs (or AN earplug) in that spin class
Miranda2010-05-02 17:55:27 +0000 #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by tulip

I've thought about wearing earplugs in some spin classes. Not only is the volume too high, the music is not to my liking (okay, it sucks. I hate that electronica stuff).

There is one older gentleman that wears ear plugs for class. They make fun of him as well... "old fuddy duddy". Well... he is smart beyound belief I'm thinking. The music related advice I received was to wear the ear plug protection. The ENT's audiologist can make a special custome mold fit pair for musicians. They are not cheap. I plan on investing in them to protect what hearing I do have... will be wearing them beyond musician purposes, but in spin class as well! The drug store sells very cheap foam ones that give the decible rating reduction. Get some, and put them in your ears next spin ride!
Miranda2010-05-02 18:42:08 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by mimitabby

How are you measuring the noise level?

If you ride where there are lots of cars passing you, you bet it is going to affect you.

Hearing loss can be proven from just attending 1 rock concert!

wear earplugs (or AN earplug) in that spin class

www.radioshack.com/s...=sound%20meters&sr=1

The above link goes to a device that someone in the music biz told me about. The product description discusses using it for measuring music mixes etc., BUT it measure overall sound decible levels. Obviously on the gym stero, you'd just set it next to the speaker and get the read. On the bike, gosh... if you really wanted to measure it, suppose it could be affixed somewhere for a test and trial. But, I would think the ENT specialist would be able to quote off the top on what levels a car produces, large truck, motor cycle accelerating etc. Just take that, and think about the multiplication of times being passed on a various length rides ! Obviously we need to hear the traffic coming up behind us for safety. But if the one ear is prone to exposure, then one plug mght be a saver. Adding that on the list to discuss with the doc.

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