Sports FAQ
Home / Running / Walking

Running with your dog

Tuckervill2010-05-01 13:32:08 +0000 #1
Ha! Imagine. ME posting in the Running section!

Anyway, I do have the ability to run, and I do run at boot camp twice a week, and I still don't like it (thanks to the US Army). However, today I just needed to get my heart pumping so I got up off the easy chair, put a leash on the Weimaraner, and took off down the road.

He liked it, he really really liked it. This is not going to be my dog long term. He's going to my son's house after the baby is a little older (the baby is a week old tomorrow!). But I could tell he really liked it and I liked it, too. I mean, I liked having the company. I might get my Golden mix into the idea. I think she'd like it, too.

I'm wondering, is there some training I should do other than the normal obedience for walking the dog? Are there special leashes? They would have to be on a leash wherever I would run. Any tips?

Thanks,

Karen
michelem2010-05-01 13:39:24 +0000 #2
I wish I could help you on the running with your dog thing! We have beagles and they are NOT good running companions. It's all or nothing. They get hot on a trail and run full speed ahead, noses to the ground, and then STOP dead in their tracks when they get to whatever it is. I've almost killed myself more than once this way. So, I run by myself and then take them for a long walk as a cooldown once I get home.

That being said, my doggies are always on leashes when I walk them. In my experience, the shorter the leash the better. The retractable leashes look like fun, but it's much harder to keep the dogs under control with those. Keeping them on a short leash keeps them more focused, so they're not zig-zagging around following their noses wherever they please. They're free to sniff and go wild at the dog park or in our fenced-in backyard.

Hopefully others have some good suggestions regarding running with your dog. Something we were told by our vet was not to run them hard when they were puppies (their own running around is fine, as well as long walks), but lots of jumping and the impact of running for long distances can be really hard on their forming joints. I think we were told to wait until they were about 1-1/2 to 2 years old before incorporating distance running (which, as I mentioned above, I learned did not work anyway!).

I see a lady doing long runs around the American River Trail with her golden. That dog either holds a big log, or the owner's water bottle in it's mouth while running. It is so fun to see! Next time I see them I'll have to pay attention to what kind of leash they use.

Have fun!
trinena2010-05-01 14:12:29 +0000 #3
I use"the buddy system" leash for walking and running my dog. I bought it from our dog trainer but I googled it & found the link below. It's great to have your hands free for dog training w/ treats & walking/running. i also make sure to have access or carry some water with me to share w/ our pup if we're out for a while. i'm glad you're both having fun! a well exercised dog is a happy dog esp. for active Weimi's.

www.thepamperedpetma...filiate&qtk=6W6wrj6g
Tuckervill2010-05-01 13:49:23 +0000 #4
I like that leash! I do have a leash with lots of options for clips and loops, but it doesn't actually have a belt. I'm getting one of those.

Thanks for the info. Yeah, if I didn't have this big Weimaraner, I wouldn't have even tried it. But Lucy the Golden mix would probably like to go faster than a walk with me. I'd have to leave the terrier mix at home, because he'd have to stop and pee every 20 feet.

Karen
anakiwa2010-05-01 14:21:08 +0000 #5
I use a hands free leash as well and like it- the one thing to watch for is that if the dog suddenly wants to change direction you get yanked along with him/her (with a hand leash there's always the emergency option of letting go)- I've gotten used to this (I have a lab and sometimes she'll decide in an instant that she needs to dive down the bank on the side of the road to find the best spot to go to the bathroom) but depending on the dog, you could get pulled somewhere you don't want to be (like into traffic). The other thing to watch for is sometimes the dog gets close to you and the leash can go slack and be easy to trip over.

Have fun! (Despite the frequent pit stops and need to stop and smell the flowers- or the pee- I love running with a dog.)
tofu2010-05-01 15:43:14 +0000 #6
I run with mine all the time! She's naturaly a good walking partner and has adapted well to the increaded speed. We use a flexi, which gives us each some room to let our bodles move naturally. I look at her frequently to see if she needs to slow down for a pee or a sniff (it's certainly not a race) and we do fine. If the dog has never had basic obedience, it's a good idea. Other than that, go for it! Again, don't expect to set a speed record, but you both will have fun. A tired dog is a well behaved dog!
charles1472010-05-01 13:51:23 +0000 #7
Yes, I have a tip! Tuckervill, you should take more responsibility for your dog and be sure to always secure the leash to the collar.

-----------------------------

Charles
channlluv2010-05-01 15:33:28 +0000 #8
I have a 100-lb lab that goes for 1.5-mile walk/runs with me, and I use a Gentle Leader with her. She's four years old and very strong, and a trainer with the humane society suggested the Gentle Leader. Retractable leashes are not good for training, especially big dogs who want to dominate you, so we've always used a 6-foot leash, but I still had trouble walking her - I'd finish the route and my back would be sore from tugging her back so much. The Gentle Leader makes it impossible for her to dominate me by tugging forward on the leash. I love it. It's saved our walking relationship.

If we had one of those handsfree leashes, she could seriously injure me if she ever jerked in a different direction than I was heading.

Roxy

Reply

Name:
Content:


Other posts in this category