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Running shoes and under/overpronation

pll2010-12-11 22:10:33 +0000 #1
Interesting article on today's New York Times:

well.blogs.nytimes.c...rs-prevent-injuries/

"across the board, motion-control shoes were the most injurious for the runners. Many overpronators, who, in theory, should have benefited from motion-control shoes, complained of pain and missed training days after wearing them, as did a number of the runners with normal feet and every single underpronating runner assigned to the motion-control shoes"I suffered the consequences of being recommended a motion control shoe once --- 3 runs with those shoes followed by 1.5 years of plantar fasciitis. Never again!
KnottedYet2010-12-11 22:13:45 +0000 #2
I was at a seminar where the dude was talking about this study before it was published. Very cool stuff!

We were all gasping in shock. It was awesome!
ultraviolet2010-12-11 22:57:57 +0000 #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by pll

I suffered the consequences of being recommended a motion control shoe once --- 3 runs with those shoes followed by 1.5 years of plantar fasciitis. Never again!

I'm still dealing with plantar fasciitis that I developed after being put in motion control shoes at a local running specialty store. Actually, they did this twice.

A few months after buying the initial pair of shoes from them, I started developing shin splints and heel tightness, so I went back in and explained what was going on. (They were the "experts" after all, right?) So, they put me in a shoe with even more motion control. And that's when my already problematic knees went to hell, I strained a hip, and the plantar fasciitis came on full force and I was barely able to walk most mornings. Needless to say, I stopped trying to run.

Five months later, I read Born To Run and decided to give neutral shoes a try. They worked. I can run now (still very, very slowly), and only have the very occasional PF flare-up (and it's never as painful as it was before...just some tightness and a little twinge-y pain) which isn't necessarily connected to the days I run.

My S.O., on the other hand, has to have some pretty hefty motion control shoes or he can't run at all. Before he started using them, he had chronic shin pain and even stress fractures. But no issues in the 4+ years since.
KnottedYet2010-12-11 23:11:48 +0000 #4
The upshot is that your body has a preferred softness or rigidity of the lower limb. Controlling the limb stiffness is how the body controls excess motion at the center of mass (how much your torso bounces around as you run).

If you put on shoes that make the limb behave as though it is too stiff, the body will try to soften the limb even more to counteract it. If you put on shoes that make the limb behave as though it were too soft, your body goes into overdrive trying to make the limb more rigid. Both compensations waste energy and stress tissues.

Posture matters much less than sense of effort and comfort in motion. If you put on a pair of shoes that make you feel like you are flying, those shoes are working with your "zone of optimal limb stiffness" to make you more efficient than the pair of shoes that feel like wobbling and wading in marshmallow or the pair of shoes that feel like stomping in hiking boots.

Buy shoes that make you feel like you're flying.

Buy OTC insoles that feel as good to your feet as your best bike saddle does to your butt.

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