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Toe to heel drop - experiences?

Dogmama2012-05-01 23:16:04 +0000 #1
I'm looking at some Saucony's that have an 8mm toe to heel drop. Is the point of this to strike at the midfoot? Has anybody switched over to these? If so, what were your experiences?
OakLeaf2012-05-01 23:24:29 +0000 #2
You know, the guy at the store yesterday mentioned those shoes to me but didn't have them in my size.

It depends what you're wearing now. I'm sure you'd notice the difference going from a 12 or 14 mm drop; if your current shoes are 10 mm, it probably depends on how sensitive you are to stuff like that. There's always some adjustment - even two pairs of the same model shoe are going to have slight variations in both construction and wear.

I really really really really wish I could find a shoe with some cushion that doesn't require me to either run on my tippytoes or smack my heels with every single step, but I've come (late) to the realization that fit has to come before everything else.
Veronica2012-05-01 23:27:25 +0000 #3
I started running in Saucony's Stabl CS or a similar show when I started running back in 2007. It's for severe over pronators and has a 12 mm drop and is HEAVY! This fall I decided to try transitioning to the Kinvara 2 - 4 mm drop. I picked the Kinvara because of the reviews here on TE and TE's return policy on shoes. I waited until I was done racing for the season to experiment.

I had been going around barefoot or in barefoot type all summer - including doing some serious hiking. I did try running in my Merrill barefoot shoes, but decided I needed some cushioning.

I did a few short runs at first in the Kinvaras - 2 to 3 miles and my longer runs in the heavy shoes. I have now switched entirely to the Kinvaras. What I like about them is they force me to run "light". I've always been sort of heavy on my feet, but they helped me to become a "lighter" runner. And I think the bright colors are cool.

Veronica
zoom-zoom2012-05-01 23:26:39 +0000 #4
Quote:

Originally Posted by OakLeaf

I really really really really wish I could find a shoe with some cushion that doesn't require me to either run on my tippytoes or smack my heels with every single step, but I've come (late) to the realization that fit has to come before everything else.

I don't know what level of stability you need, but you might really like the Nike Lunarfly. I've been running in these for quite some time. They are very lightweight, lower profile, but still quite cushy. I alternate them with my New Balance 905s. On paper they are similar (both are lightweight, light stability performance trainers), but the feel is very different. The Nikes feel like a much plusher shoe, but they still don't have bulky heels and have a really flexible forefoot.
OakLeaf2012-05-02 00:02:09 +0000 #5
They look good, but they don't even come in D width for women, let alone the EE I need. I can (could) squeeze into Nike's Zoom Structure Triax 13 in D width, but I'd love to get away from the huge heel, plus I don't even know whether the current version (#15) fits or not.

I'm trying a pair of Mizuno Inspire in men's EE, which when I tried them in the store yesterday didn't have too terribly much heel slip. They're still really built up and have a pointy toe, but we'll see.
zoom-zoom2012-05-02 00:32:52 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by OakLeaf

They look good, but they don't even come in D width for women, let alone the EE I need. I can (could) squeeze into Nike's Zoom Structure Triax 13 in D width, but I'd love to get away from the huge heel, plus I don't even know whether the current version (#15) fits or not.

I wear a D, too...that's one reason I like the Lunarflys--they actually fit me really well and have a really roomy toebox (and don't limit me to NB--about the only company that makes wide width performance shoes). I can't wear most medium-width women's shoes. I wonder how the men's would fit. I would imagine that they might work well if you are an EE.
GLC19682012-05-01 23:42:17 +0000 #7
I run in a 4mm drop NB Minimus Trail (wide width, of course!). Zero cushioning, but I like it that way as I'd be running totally barefoot if I could get my skin to cooperate. Transition from a custom orthotic fitted high stability, high drop NB shoe took me months and I wasn't a high mileage runner to begin with...

My husband recently switched from a 12mm drop shoe (a Nike style, not sure which) to the 4mm drop NB Minimus Road version. The Road has more cushioning in the forefoot than the trail does and it suits him well. He wasn't putting in a lot of miles before, so his transition has been easier than it might have been for a serious runner, but he's loving the new shoes. He comments almost every run how he enjoys being able to feel the road and precisely how his foot is positioned, so that he can immediately correct it. This is after we took a Chi Running clinic (which is what prompted his shoe shopping in the first place), so he was already working on improving his form before making the switch.

The NB Minimus Road is on sale at most stores right now for $60 ish because they are replacing it with a new design in the spring. So if you don't mind not being able to keep the same shoe going forward, it might be a nice, inexpensive, low-drop shoe to try.
OakLeaf2012-05-02 00:05:15 +0000 #8
Quote:

Originally Posted by GLC1968

The NB Minimus Road is on sale at most stores right now for $60 ish because they are replacing it with a new design in the spring.

NB says the new version will be zero-drop. So for the purists (or plantar fasciitis sufferers) for whom 4 mm is too much, it might be worth the wait and the extra cost.

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