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So hard to meditate

Csilla2010-07-04 22:02:51 +0000 #1
could you help me with my meditation? I was told that meditation could help with ease my pain. So I tried to practice before bed every night recently. BUT... it is so hard - when I sit there (diamond or lotus), I just feel my physical discomforts, my legs/feet/back and shoulder, they all in either pain or discomfort. I try not to think about the pain (or let it go), but it never stop bothering me until I get up and give up.

does meditation really help reduce the pain, if so, could you train me to do the right way?

Thank you very much for your input.
justwannabe2010-07-04 22:10:02 +0000 #2
personally I like vijrasana on a meditation bench, more of my thoughts about it on this posting www.yogaforums.com/f...a-practice-2759.html

but this is not about me but you finding what is right for you.

I do a light asana, a breathing practice and a mantra before I try and meditate. The asanas take 20 minutes, The breathing practice is to expell the stored up bad air, the mantra to get me vibrating in a better mental space and then I let go and meditate. This is what is working for me and it may not fit your eye, be confident that you will find your way, you can. it takes time and hurdles may come up, keep it going through the good and bad and you may find peace

Best wishes to you

on the journey

seeker
Fin2010-07-04 22:12:36 +0000 #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by Csilla



I was told that meditation could help with ease my pain.

Looks like you came to meditation with a hope of easing pain.

Might be a good idea to address the issue of pain. Yoga asanas & ayurveda can assist in that …

To experience meditation sit any where in any position that affords maximum comfort then close your eyes and follow your in breath & out breath for 15mins to 20mins. Breathe through the nose and make your breath nice & steady. Allow the many thoughts & chatter that develops to evaporate or simply leave as through a revolving door. Enjoy the peace that comes from this exercise. Meditation does not need to be any more sophisticated then this. This lovely practice can create much space in your mind & spirit as you start to differentiate between your ego & the higher self. In time you will feel & see the infinite expanse of space beyond the ego the higher self & finally to your divine self…

Best wishes to you.

Love,

Fin
Bridgette2010-07-04 22:54:41 +0000 #4
I don't like meditating in lotus pose personally. I prefer adepts pose or hero's pose instead. Primarily because with meditation, it's not ALWAYS about intense stretching (at the heart of yoga is never forcing yourself into a pose or maintaining it if it's causing you discomfort). The key to Meditating is about being comfortable, clearing the mind, and maintaining good breath.
Renich2010-07-04 22:51:51 +0000 #5
Namaste. I am new to this yoga forum. All of the advice is great for meditating. I only want to add to try and be patient. Meditating takes practice and improves with time.

When I first started, it was very difficult for me. I have a very busy mind. I too concentrated on my breathing. Also, I found a beautiful picture that I considered to be paradise. I would stare at that picture for about 5 minutes. Then I would close my eyes and draw it in my mind. I'd start with the sky and get down to the beach. It helped me to release the days activities from my mind.

Eventually, I was able to meditate and get fulfillment from it.
Pandara2010-07-04 23:16:48 +0000 #6
Hi,

Can you please expand on the pain you want to ease. Where is this pain, what causes this pain etc.

If for example you aches and pains are physical manifestations of mental or emotional pain, yes medition can help in adjusting the mindset to these pains. However, if your pain is due to some injury etc, perhaps considering medical help will ease your pain more than meditation.

Meditation is a wonderful practice, but to help you we need to know more about these pains your are talking and their origins in your life.
Bridgette2010-07-04 23:06:17 +0000 #7
I read somewhere an interesting theory that yoga was actually developed to prepare the body for meditation because yogis knew that without a flexible, supple, pain free body it was difficult to quite the mind. I'm not sure about it's authenticity but it's fascinating and a possibility.
Hubert2010-07-04 23:37:06 +0000 #8
This is not a theory. This is the truth.
cyclezen2010-07-05 02:01:21 +0000 #9
Quote:

Originally Posted by Csilla



could you help me with my meditation? I was told that meditation could help with ease my pain. So I tried to practice before bed every night recently. BUT... it is so hard - when I sit there (diamond or lotus), I just feel my physical discomforts, my legs/feet/back and shoulder, they all in either pain or discomfort. I try not to think about the pain (or let it go), but it never stop bothering me until I get up and give up.

does meditation really help reduce the pain, if so, could you train me to do the right way?

Thank you very much for your input.

I can certainly vouch that meditation can help reduce the experiencing of pain. As mentioned in an earlier post, a painful experience is what brought me to the realization of meditation.

Purely from my limited experience, might I suggest a few things.

Use a position of comfort, whatever that might be. And preferrably one which allows you to remain alert rather than one which dulls you. A position which causes discomfort is a powerful distraction from where you want to go. I often (actually mostly) use savasana and sometimes a seated position. Savasana because when I first 'found' meditation it was the position I was actually in and not able to change, so I adapted to that. Others may find savasana to dulling and prone to sleepiness.

If I am seated I use a blanket under the hips because my hip muscles are very tight and will fight that position unless I allow them to remain open and loose. Sitting without a blanket causes the lower back and therefor everything stacked above it to want to lean backward, which I have to counteract - a distraction. One goal of my asana practice is to help my hips to become more supple...

I would suggest not trying to meditate before bedtime. Meditation, for me, works best when I still have some mental alertness available. Certainly after a well experienced meditative session, I come out of it more alert than I went in - not something you want if you want to go directly to bed ... to sleep

It can often take up to 2 hrs after meditation to become ready for sleep, for me.

Some people like to chant, I find it a further distraction. I prefer to focus on my breath at the start of meditation. No music, as little environmental distractions possible, steady breezes and smells from an outdoor session are fine - music invites to easily to get into it, rather than my mind.

At any point I find I'm loosing control of where I want my mind to go, I drop back into observing my breathing. Its complex enough to focus my attention and internal enough to bring me to my third eye quickly.

Pain - mediation, for me, works well if there are periods when it is sharper than normal. Meditation helps take it to a background experience. And after some experience in subduing it, you can develop triggers which can help you take it to background quicker and more effectively. But its still there.

Its still best to deal with the root of the pain, if thats available to you, and let meditative techniques help with the sharp spikes of what remains.

I had a fairly severe shoulder separation six weeks ago. The 1st three weeks after were difficult, but made easier by short meditative sessions. Even now mediation is helping for what is reduced, but still constant discomfort.

At first, when starting a meditation with pain being experienced, it'll seem almost as if the pain is heightened. That's cause your mind has only a few things to focus on. AS you move to another focus, maybe your breath and breathing, the mind will loose interest in the pain and it will drop to the background.

Keep at it, when you are able to control and send the pain to the background, you'll find the effort was and is worth it.
Hubert2010-07-04 23:24:10 +0000 #10
cyclezen:

I also use pain. Some think this is sick ... but when you are sick, and cannot help it ... you have to work with what you have.

I came to a feeling that even my unhappiness makes me happy. I mean, in meditation, when you totally surrender to that pain ... and there is nothing you can do - and someone inside quietly smiles, and you feel the confidence, peace, and love of that smile.

The ego manifests in the mind, and want to follow things it likes, and avoid things it dislikes. To go beyond, both likes and dislikes must be transcended. And if you think of it ... unpleasant things can be easiere transcended, as we tend to attach to the pleasant ones.

I am not trying to preach fatalism, weakness, laziness; naturally we try to avoid suffering, and make our and fellow people's life a most pleasant experience ... but we often do this the wrong way.

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