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neck, shoulders, upper-back pain

Csilla2010-07-04 22:45:16 +0000 #1
Hi All

I had neck/shoulders/upper back pain for more than 6 years. I have tried Physical therepy, Arcupucture, Chropractor; took prescription pain killer; and of course hot bath, hot pad, differant shapes and types of pillows and changed my mattriss several times too. I trid so many ways to relax myself ....Nothing really helped much. I started to do Yoga about 1.5 years ago. Over the time, Yoga did help me. I find my pain level has reduced some. but... I am still not pain free. far from that.

I have heard and read about people who have pain problems have cured themselves by doing Yoga. I wonder is it true? How long do I need to wait until I can really enjoy "pain free"?
Alix2010-07-04 22:54:27 +0000 #2
Csilla, I started yoga because of debilitating lower back problems. It took me a couple of years but I can report being pain free more than 90% of the time now.
Csilla2010-07-04 23:25:07 +0000 #3
I wonder how frequent should we doing Yoga per week. I would think everyday should be the best, but if it is impossible (too busy). What is the Minimum that we have to commit to in order to receive the Healing benifit. As I mentioned in my other email, I have been practicing yoga for 1.5 yr, but have not received significent benifit yet (My goal is Pain Free).

In the past, I go to a hot yoga studio once a week. Then I do some streches at home about twice a week (each time about 40 minues to 1 hour). I wonder if I was doing too little? Is that the reason that I am still have those sturben pain?

What type of yoga should work for me the best? there are so many types, I dont' know which one to choose. I was practising hot yoga, I like it. I wonder if I should also check out some other type that would work better for me?

Anyway, thanks for any advice/suggestions.
Pandara2010-07-04 23:56:06 +0000 #4
Hi,

It took my back pain nearly three years (even longer) of yoga before it started to get better, but I still have my days where it is painful, especially if I do certain asanas.

May I pose another question to you with respect? I pick-up a fear of pain in you, why? I know pain is uncomfortable, but I have learned over the years that pain can also be a great teacher if we allow ourselves to see past the pain and discover the teaching. For example, when my lower back start to pain, I know I am subconsciously starting to worry about money (I run my own business) and isn't the body so wonderful in warning you about the attachment. I immediately start to change my mindset and the pain disappear.

I don't say this will work for you, but it is another way of looking at pain. Perhaps try it and see where you get. In a previous thread on more or less the same topic I posted a thread to a wonderful book by Louise Hay on this, search for it, it may help you.
cyclezen2010-07-04 23:03:14 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by Csilla



Hi All

I had neck/shoulders/upper back pain for more than 6 years. I have tried...

....Nothing really helped much. I started to do Yoga about 1.5 years ago. Over the time, Yoga did help me. I find my pain level has reduced some. but... I am still not pain free. far from that.

I have heard and read about people who have pain problems have cured themselves by doing Yoga. I wonder is it true? How long do I need to wait until I can really enjoy "pain free"?

Csilla, the questions you are asking are ones which no one may be able to answer. If your pain issues are not tied to some clear issue or injury, then finding resolution may be as nebulous as what all is causing it.

Better defining what all has contributed to your conditions will go a long way to taking steps to reversing or resolving your condition. And then genetics always plays a big role in whatever state we all find ourselves.

Please don't take what Im sayin as negative. Finding improvement and whatever level of resolution is predicated on defining all the factors and causes in the first place. It clear that both Alix and Pandera have been able to better their own situation because they defined the causes of their issues. That would be true for any of us, if we seek improvement of our own issues.

From my own experiences, I try not to put a heavy burden or 'timetable' on anything I do to improve physical issues, especially yoga. I'm well past any need for 'deadlines' for physical/athletic goals. Rather I put major emphasis on enjoying and experiencing every practice, for what it brings. I let time determine if the desired improvement is happening. Then I add or change as the need asks it.

I think many of us can attest to 'overcoming' one condition, only to find encumbered with some 'new' issue. So the ultimate state of 'cured' may never really happen.

If I can make a yoga practice 'enjoyable', 'enlightening' and 'empowering', inspite of issues; then, I find it easier to do the same thing (enjoy,enlighten, empower) with the other things which compose my daily life.

Its important to have a far vision, but all we really can be sure of and make the best of, is the 'here' and 'now'. One good step in front of the other gets you down the road; and hopefully in a good way.
Pandara2010-07-05 01:11:22 +0000 #6
Hi Cyclezen,

Thanks for your beautiful reminder as well, true words spoken, it gave me another way of looking at something I am struggling with at the moment in my life.
keef3212010-07-05 01:32:50 +0000 #7
I too had the similar problems too you, and tried all sorts. For me though I found by doing 15 mins a day of gentle asana (for 1 year), followed by some pranayama helped me lots.

Problem was I got bored of the gentle asana, just because I was having problems on what to do with my attention (ie. my mind wandering and getting bored). I then tried Ashtanga because I liked the sound of how your mind would be focused, but found this just agitated my back even more, and I did not find it had the spiritual and relaxing effects of the more gentle approach (not saying it does not, but it is not for me just now).

For the last 10 weeks I have been attending a regular Iyengar class, and found this excellent for focus and for understanding my body. I now know my problems stem from when sitting, or at a computer etc, from rounding my shoulders, slumping just slightly my upper back, and having a slight forward head (no one else would ever notice it though, just me with the pain). In fact, in the past my pain used to nearly be constant, but now really only starts it cycle when I have been sitting for periods.

I am not saying Iyengar is the only way, or the answer, but perhaps like me you should explore some local yoga options (I travel 1 hour to attend my class).

Hope this helps.

Keith
Csilla2010-07-04 23:34:27 +0000 #8
Thanks, there. I really appreciate your inputs. The cause of my pain I think is from my work. My job requires me to sit in front of a computer all day long. I do try to adjust my pose and TRY to move around a little once a while, but the type of work I am doing is just impossible to avoid long hours of using computer. I will check out the book you mentioned there.

anyway, I am very happy to get so many response back. Thank you all a lot, I love this forum !
Alix2010-07-05 00:42:01 +0000 #9
Csilla, I don't know if this will be helpful to you or not but someone once shared with me that when looking at back pain that pain in your upper back means you are burdens with cares about others. Lower back pain often reflects worries/cares about yourself. I hope you are able to find the class you need. Respectfully, perhaps you could look at other types of yoga as well? I did not find hot yoga all that helpful, but found Iyengar/Hatha types released more for me. Just a thought.

Pandara, your situation sounds similar to my own. It is amazing how identifying what the root cause of your pain can help you to discover a new path that is healthier and more manageable.

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