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Rivette2010-07-04 23:20:24 +0000 #1
Hi - I'm just starting out and taking my first class. Is it usual to have music playing during Yoga class? I'm finding it somewhat distracting.
InnerAthlete2010-07-04 23:34:47 +0000 #2
Hello Rivette,

You may find the phrase "usual" as it relates to yoga and the forum to be a less than clarifying term.

The answer about music is simply that some do and some do not play music during class. The same can be said of burning incense and turning up the heat, to mention only a few.

And from my experience those playing music stick by it just as those not playing it do. Each group, I imagine, has a bevy of reasons why and it might be educational to inquire of the teacher why they play music. I know I welcome such questions about this and other things around the practice. An asking student is an engaged student.

My personal sense, which may be meaningless to you here, is that music is marvelous, but not during my practice. I've got enough sound already in my life. It is stillness and quiet that I find a need to carve out. And my practice is one of internal reference so that which is external draws me away rather than into. Obviously there are some external things that are beyond control - other students, passing sirens, aromas from restaurants...and that is fine. I simply prefer not to add to it.

The resolutions are obvious, no?

If you cannot find joy in the practice there with the music then it would be sensible to go where there is none.
Nichole2010-07-04 23:34:51 +0000 #3
Hello Rivette,

In Classical Yoga asana classes, I think it is very unusual to have music playing. Other than having a single teacher play a flute during savasana, I had not heard of music being played during class until my friend told me that this was a regular thing at our local Core Power studio. She said that the music there ranged from New Age to hip hop.

Our daily lives are full of images and noise, from movies, magazines, the internet, buzzing florescent lights, TV, cellphones, you name it. I find it soothing to have a space free of these things as a container for my practice.

When I was little, my Grandma Julianna told me when I complained to her that God was not answering my prayers, that maybe I should try being quiet so I could hear him (she also recommended sitting still...you see the pattern here ) Now that I am older, I consider this brilliant advice.

Namaste
ScottHughes2010-07-05 00:38:04 +0000 #4
I prefer music when I do Yoga, but I usually do it alone rather than in a class. I don't know if I would prefer it the other way in a class, but I doubt it. Usually social settings are more comfortable when music is playing.
xela2010-07-05 00:56:46 +0000 #5
I love to have music playing in class. I don't like it when there are too many words though...I find it distracting.
Kaos2010-07-05 00:11:06 +0000 #6
Hello, my first post. Wonderful forum you have here.

Interesting thread btw. However, it seems I detect a particular distaste for music among certain members of this yoga forum.

Whatever happened to OM, the sound and symbol of the universe? Sound therefore, includes music. Perhaps, a quiet and contemplative atmosphere is nice and conducive

when practicing yoga or meditation for that matter, but it is not necessary.

For example, in Bhakti-yoga, which is another form of meditation, it involves the chanting, and hearing in sound, the names of the Lord.

Namaste
Nichole2010-07-05 00:36:40 +0000 #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kaos



Interesting thread btw. However, it seems I detect a particular distaste for music among certain members of this yoga forum.

Whatever happened to OM, the sound and symbol of the universe? Sound therefore, includes music. Perhaps, a quiet and contemplative atmosphere is nice and conducive

when practicing yoga or meditation for that matter, but it is not necessary.

Hello Kaos and welcome to Yoga Forums,

I was unclear on how you detected a "distaste for music" from anyone sharing on this forum, especially on this thread. Would you please be specific to what and to whom you are referring to?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kaos



For example, in Bhakti-yoga, which is another form of meditation, it involves the chanting, and hearing in sound, the names of the Lord.

Namaste

From my understanding of what I have learned from my teachers, Bhakti Yoga is a path of Yoga, specifically a path of devotional practices and to a personally chosen deity or representation of God. That meditation is a practice that may--or may not--be part of an individual's Bhakti sadhana, but Bhakti Yoga is not limited to meditation or defined by it. It is also not necessary to have chanting (or listening to the names of God) as a practice to be on the Bhakti path.

Is what you are referring to in your post as Bhakti-Yoga better presented as the Nada Yoga (e.g. Kirtan, Om Mantra, etc.) aspects of the Bhakti Yoga path?

Please share more with us; I hope that you will.

Thank you.

Namaste
InnerAthlete2010-07-05 01:09:36 +0000 #8
Kaos raises a good point.

My personal preferences aside (since they are only for my practice and that is what makes them personal preferences in the first place)...

Nothing happened to OM. Om is completely appropriate and used frequently. Oddly enough there are many teachers who use music but are scared to death to OM in their class.

Om is the sound of the infinite, it is a vibration rather than a song. There is nothing wrong with singing OM, however OM within the yogic context is not a chorus line, orchestra, or song. Again, it may be used as such but it is no more song than a cat purr is a meow.

Obviously one is not chanting OM or the gayatri during asana practice and I believe "yoga" in this thread at least, seems to represent asana class.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kaos



Hello, my first post. Wonderful forum you have here.

Interesting thread btw. However, it seems I detect a particular distaste for music among certain members of this yoga forum.

Whatever happened to OM, the sound and symbol of the universe? Sound therefore, includes music. Perhaps, a quiet and contemplative atmosphere is nice and conducive

when practicing yoga or meditation for that matter, but it is not necessary.

For example, in Bhakti-yoga, which is another form of meditation, it involves the chanting, and hearing in sound, the names of the Lord.

Namaste
Hubert2010-07-05 00:49:24 +0000 #9
For most people when they come from the crazy outside world, it is scary to jump right into the ocean of silence. We need the stimuli from the senses otherwise we fall asleep. Music can bridge this gap.

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