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Lower back pain

xela2010-07-05 03:36:13 +0000 #1
Hello everyone,

Lately my lower back has been killing me. I steped in a hole a few days ago while walking my dog and I feel like it compressed a bunch of vertabrae. Only thing is that it has been a bit sore for a few days before that, but now its not just soreness...its pain.

Also, I sit at a desk all day and its been very hard lately. I'm constantly having to do a modified talasana-esque pose on my chair to kind of stretch out my spine.

I have refrained from doing any backbends because I'm scared I'll hurt myself worse, but are there ary posed I could do to help?
Nichole2010-07-05 03:46:41 +0000 #2
Hello Xela,

I am sorry to hear that you are in pain. I have been taught to rest while the injury is acute, but maybe some passive, prone postures like Saastaangasana and Makarasana, where the weight is distributed across the entire length of the body, would be ok for you since you are an advanced student and you know what to watch for.

Baths with plenty of epsoms salts can really speed up the healing of muscle strains. Maybe you can get your partner in crime--your sweet dog--a treat and he/she will curl up next to the tub while you soak! Arnica montana, both topical and oral, often make a big difference for strains.

Consider too that this might be a chance to explore other aspects of your yoga practice while you rest body for a few days.

I hope you're feeling better soon.

Namaste
xela2010-07-05 04:21:13 +0000 #3
Thanks, Nichole! I want to do the epsom salt baths, but I just got a new tattoo and can't soak fully for 10 days!

Bad timing!!!
Alix2010-07-05 04:56:48 +0000 #4
Oh Xela OUCH! I sympathize, as I have dealt with lower back pain for years. Let me see if I can find the link to the suggestions InnerAthlete gave me. Edit: try here.: www.yogaforums.com/f...highlight=Back+Spasm

For starters though, can you sit on an exercise ball at your desk? I know that sounds strange, but it is truly a godsend. Keeps your spine in alignment and you are forced to use the correct motion to rise from sitting which is a huge help to the affected area.
xela2010-07-05 03:51:58 +0000 #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by Alix



Oh Xela OUCH! I sympathize, as I have dealt with lower back pain for years. Let me see if I can find the link to the suggestions InnerAthlete gave me. Edit: try here.: www.yogaforums.com/f...highlight=Back+Spasm

For starters though, can you sit on an exercise ball at your desk? I know that sounds strange, but it is truly a godsend. Keeps your spine in alignment and you are forced to use the correct motion to rise from sitting which is a huge help to the affected area.

I was looking through the gaiam catalog and they have a balance ball chair there that I really want, but I'll have to see if it will be a problem bringing it into work. They also have a few other things you can put in your chair that help keep your pelvis and spin in the right position, so I might try those first.

Thanks for the link too...I'm going to read it now.
Trinity2010-07-05 03:57:40 +0000 #6
Hi,

Your description of the event makes me think that perhaps you've compressed your vertebrae and now have a bulging disc. When an intervertebral disc protrudes laterally (to the side) it may cause irritation of nerves - aka OUCH.

If you do have a bulging disc, yoga can help you to move back into alignment. If you feel that you are capable of a performing a gentle asana practice, please do so under the watchful eye of an experienced teacher who'll guide you into proper alignment.

I have heard that side plank (Vasisthasana) is amazing for back pain as all quadrants draw discs back into alignment. This pose can be modified by keeping the lower knee down.

Alix's link to InnerAthlete's advice is so amazingly comprehensive. I hope that it assists your in your healing journey.

Here is a link to an article on lower back pain that you may find useful as well. Trinity Yoga Blog: Lower Back Pain: www.trinityyoga.net/...try/lower-back-pain/

namaste,

Sonja
InnerAthlete2010-07-05 05:36:18 +0000 #7
I'm not going to regurgitate what I've already posted re: the previous lower back issue around muscles in spasm. What I will point out is that more care should be used in prognosis when it does not follow diagnosis.

Huh? He said, "we don't know what you did". I typically would not tell a student, let alone someone on an Internet forum, anything regarding a spinal injury. Why? Two reasons. One the fear alone can do far more damage to the student than the actual injury and two, when we place such a thing "out there" it gathers a propensity to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Since the muscles around the spine are smooth and not striated they respond more to emotions, thoughts, and feelings. Some bright chap said 'the thought manifests as the word...the word manifests as the deed...'

As I stated in another post here, the language of the student has to shift immediately. In fact it's one of the primary responders and it's easy, free, and right there in you. It's not "killing" you but rather teaching you. The relationship with the dialogue of the dis-ease, the illness, the injury must be the sort of marriage that lasts a lifetime, not the sort that ends in divorce.

It is possible, though unlikely, that stepping in a hole would result in spinal injury. More likely, the femur slammed into the acetabulum and that might have aggravated a variety of muscles, might have shifted the pelvic girdle, might have subluxated a vertebra, might have jambed the sacroiliac joint. But these things can all be healed in a straight forward fashion.

If you are the sort who believes in chiropractic this is a good time to go. I do and I would. Once you get an idea of the "what" then we can provide a much better "how".

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