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Controversial new yoga documentary

John Philp2010-07-05 04:39:53 +0000 #1
Hi All,

I'm a producer/director who has just finished a documentary about the yoga industry called 'Yoga, Inc.'. The film examines some alarming trends in the yoga industry, such as a move to get yoga in the Olympics, the rise of Starbucks-style yoga chains and the increasing number of 'intellectual property' fights over differing yoga styles. Basically the film asks whether yoga can survive big business with its good karma intact. You can check out clips from the film out at my website, www.baddogtales.com: www.baddogtales.com , where you can also purchase the film. And I'd love to hear what you all think!

Best,

John Philp

Writer/Producer/Director, 'Yoga, Inc.'
justwannabe2010-07-05 04:51:51 +0000 #2
for me yoga is a tool to help me find myself.

Give two people $100 and one person may go out to a bar, get drunk, and waste all their money

another may go and buy food for themselves, give some to charity, and hold onto some for the future.

One person does bad with the money, one person does good with it. My perception of what money is, is not changed by what others choose to do with it. for me money is a tool

I use yoga to help me find myself, what others do with it is their decision. I will not be upset with their choices nor very concerned about it. Yoga is about Me and nothing else. Does that mean I am selfish, yes, but the more I find me the more I enjoy assisting others when they ask for it.

like ricky bobby said,

if you aint first, your last
esotericus2010-07-05 05:20:38 +0000 #3
Personally I have doubts about nude yoga and the idea of competitive yoga turns me off. What good is it to gentrify it as a competitive sport when that has nothing to do with its purpose and it would most certainly alienate all who would benefit the most from it? What's next? drug testing for olympic yogis? Patanjali would most certainly protest. “Intellectual property' fights over differing yoga styles?” That's insane and it's robbery. The government of India should officially condemn these disputes as degrading a national treasure. It's like people fighting over the pyramids when none of them were there when they were built!

Yoga cannot be copyrighted. There is no one alive today who has the right to claim a copyright, you[referring to anyone claiming a yoga copyright] did not exist when yoga came into being. Forsake such a delusion if you have one or get professional help.

True Yoga is a rock-solid tradition that has endured 5,000 years and it will outlive the antics of any money-hungry yogi or the hare-brained schemes of some executive. And yes, there can be innovations and new implementations as long as they are beneficial and preserve the spirit of yoga.

Well, I hope this video really does a good job of showing what's gone wrong- and steers its viewers to seek out what is right. I've seen the clips, but of course one needs to see it all to analyze this. When is it coming out?
InnerAthlete2010-07-05 05:22:33 +0000 #4
I've watched the clips and I like what I've seen. I do not know how well it puts forth the concepts around which it was produced. I'm not sure there's controversy here. Who's disagreeing?

My teacher wrote, in his last book, that "yoga is everywhere and no where at all". How sadly true.

I personally don't find outrage to be very helpful on the path to evolution. What the current state of yoga in the West demonstrates is the unchecked nature of the Ego through the conduit of yoga. As a yoga teacher it is my task, my charge, my dharma, to teach authentically based on my lineage and training. In that vein, the ego is consistently checked on the part of the instructor for his/her own ego and for the student by the teacher.

There is nothing wrong with making a profit within the context of surviving to meet one's dharma in a capitalist society. It is HOW it's done that is in question (I believe).

When the student become self important, self involved, and loses sight of living the Sutras in favor of memorizing them, it is at that point that we must ask ourselves "what are we doing"?
esotericus2010-07-05 05:59:41 +0000 #5
There is nothing wrong with making a profit within the context of surviving to meet one's dharma in a capitalist society. It is HOW it's done that is in question (I believe).

When the student become self important, self involved, and loses sight of living the Sutras in favor of memorizing them, it is at that point that we must ask ourselves "what are we doing"?[/quote]

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You pretty much sum it up much better than I did, as you said It is HOW it's done that is in question (I believe).

I have no problem with profit either as long as there is authenticity. I have taken classes both as a part of work benefits and from my own pocket and it has all been worth it. In fact, I send forth an intention and prayer with love and concern towards all seeking yoga in all existing forms and forms to come, that their higher selves will lead them to what is best for them, Namaste.

I hope this documentary goes beyond just showing the problem and draws people towards authentic solutions. In a nutshell, towards the authentic teaching you referred to.

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