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Balance problems

Jo2010-07-05 03:18:05 +0000 #1
Hi, I have a student who has problems doing any balance poses that require you to stand on one leg. She has flat feet and constantly has to wear insteps in her shoes. When she tries the balances, her feet seem to be rolling inwards and hence putting her off balance. Any suggestions?
InnerAthlete2010-07-05 03:23:39 +0000 #2
Hi Jo,

Here are my thoughts regarding the student you mention.

The three components to balance (in the physical practice) are focus, breath, and physiology.

From an asana perspective teach the student proper standing pose actions in the foundation, or feet of the poses. In this case pressing down or rooting into the toe mounds (but not the toes) and the inner and outer heels. Then when the student has found the root, ask her to drawn the inner arches to the pelvis. This will help counter the eversion she's now doing.

The same actions can be taught in Tadasana, Vira I and II (front leg), Parsvakonasana (front leg), trikonasana, and ardha chandrasana (and Adho Mukha Svanasana if the soles come to the floor).

Therapeutically, having the student rub the soles of the feet in Virasana is one of the best poses for fallen arches. Outside of asana, but still therapeutically speaking, there are stone pads ( cobblestone walkways: www.chievolution.com...lestone-resource.php ) which one can purchase and walk on to stimulate the meridians in the foot. There are similar products around. These take body weight and so they're very effective.

Emotionally, when we are out of balance (lifestyle) we are out of balance. If you have a close relationship with this student it might be prudent to have a chat here and there to determine if she's having balance issues off the mat. Remedy there may be challenging but the two can walk parallel paths - balance the life balance the asana.

I hope this provides you a start or a few leads in how to approach the issue with this student. There are two more little tidbits. One, the student can do the pose with the wall until she's feeling more confident with her balance. And two, she can adjust her paradigm (and perhaps yours) to a place where falling from standing poses is quite okay, as long as she gets back up
Jo2010-07-05 04:00:59 +0000 #3
Thanks for your advice, I'll try those things. We've tried the wall and that sort of works but she kind of likes to try to be away from the wall. What are your thoughts on strapping the foot with a bandage around the instep so that the heel and ball of the foot are free? Do you think this will give support and assistance as far as balance goes?

Thanks

Jo

Quote:

Originally Posted by InnerAthlete



Hi Jo,

Here are my thoughts regarding the student you mention.

The three components to balance (in the physical practice) are focus, breath, and physiology.

From an asana perspective teach the student proper standing pose actions in the foundation, or feet of the poses. In this case pressing down or rooting into the toe mounds (but not the toes) and the inner and outer heels. Then when the student has found the root, ask her to drawn the inner arches to the pelvis. This will help counter the eversion she's now doing.

The same actions can be taught in Tadasana, Vira I and II (front leg), Parsvakonasana (front leg), trikonasana, and ardha chandrasana (and Adho Mukha Svanasana if the soles come to the floor).

Therapeutically, having the student rub the soles of the feet in Virasana is one of the best poses for fallen arches. Outside of asana, but still therapeutically speaking, there are stone pads ( cobblestone walkways: www.chievolution.com...lestone-resource.php ) which one can purchase and walk on to stimulate the meridians in the foot. There are similar products around. These take body weight and so they're very effective.

Emotionally, when we are out of balance (lifestyle) we are out of balance. If you have a close relationship with this student it might be prudent to have a chat here and there to determine if she's having balance issues off the mat. Remedy there may be challenging but the two can walk parallel paths - balance the life balance the asana.

I hope this provides you a start or a few leads in how to approach the issue with this student. There are two more little tidbits. One, the student can do the pose with the wall until she's feeling more confident with her balance. And two, she can adjust her paradigm (and perhaps yours) to a place where falling from standing poses is quite okay, as long as she gets back up

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